Author Archive | Ellen Lindner

Is It Hot in Here or is It Just Me?

As a warm-natured Floridian, I’m often asking “Is it hot in here, or is it just me?”  The hot colors of this quilt made me think of that, so I used my frequent question as the title.

Is it Hot in Here, or is It Just Me? An improvisational art quilt by Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com

Is it Hot in Here, or is It Just Me?

This quilt is larger than most of mine, 54 high x 49 wide.  So large, in fact, I thought it might one day get used for snuggle purposes. With that in mind, I put a binding on it.  (For the first time in about 14 years!)  Of course, I still consider it an art quilt and I added a sleeve for hanging.

Here’s a detail shot.

Is it Hot in Here, or is It Just Me? - detail. An improvisational art quilt by Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com

This quilt was a lot of fun to make!  You can see my in-progess posts in the related links, below.

This piece is for sale.  Find full info here.

Ellen Lindner

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Stitched: Final Quilts

Here are the final pieces from “Stitched:  Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art.”

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Florida, by Pam Morris

 

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Mangroves, by Pam Morris

 

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Celebrating The Ainu, by Yolanda Reardon

 

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Incoming Messages, by Susan Rienzo

 

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Sunshine State of Mind II, by Susan Rienzo

 

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Leather & Lace, Broken Whole, by Michele Sanandajian

 

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Star by Choice, by Michele Sanandajian

 

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Winter Solitude, by Becky Stack

 

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Moons of Neptune + one, by Rhoda Taylor

 

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Post Traumatic Stress Demons, by Patrician Anderson Turner

 

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Maestro, by Patricia Anderson Turner

 

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Crystal Clear, by Marianne R. Williamson

 

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Tis the Season, by Marianne R.Williamson

All the pieces in this exhibit were made by Florida members of SAQA (Studio Art Quilt Associates.)  I hope you’ve enjoyed seeing them.

Ellen Lindner

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“Stitched” Exhibit – Part Three

More art from “Stitched:  Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art.”

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Membrane, by Deborah Krajkowski

 

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Benzaiten, by Deborah Krajkowski

 

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Tribute to Maria of San Ildefonso, by Janice Kreuzinger

 

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Sunset Cove, by Karol Kusmaul

 

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Wing It, by Loreen Leedy

 

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Second Thoughts, by Ellen Lindner

More about the quilt above.

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Vine Ripened, by Ellen Lindner

More about the quilt above.

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Energy of Hope, by Susan Lumsden

 

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Sweat Equity, by Susan Lumsden

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Grapes, by Shirley MacGregor

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Nonsynchronous Array, by Sheilana Massey

These quilts were recently on display at the  Court House Cultural Center, in Stuart, FL.

Stay tuned for the final segment.

Ellen Lindner

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“Stitched” Exhibit – Part Two

Continuing on with quilts from “Stitched:  Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art.”

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Casual Query #6 or 2nd Amendment Remedy, by Leslie Hall

 

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Liberty Tonic, by Leslie Hall

 

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Religion Poisons Everything, by Louise Hall

 

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Blue Rockfish, by Christine Holden

 

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Gathering Storm, by Christine Holden

 

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Quiet Moment, by Christine Holden

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Earth Whispers, by Andrea Huffman

 

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Listening, by Andrea Huffman

 

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Greenhouse Green Monster, by Doris Hulse

 

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Wind in Her Ears, by Margaret Knepper

All art quilts were made by Florida members of SAQA, Studio Art Quilt Associates.  More images to come!

Ellen Lindner

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“Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art” – Part One

Remember me telling you about the “Stitched” exhibit, in Stuart, FL?  It’s about to end, so I thought I’d show you the quilts, in case you didn’t get to see them.  (This will take several posts.)  Enjoy!

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Tribute to Selene, by Sharon Buck

 

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Citrus, by Cheryl Costley

 

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Red Violet Structure, by Cheryl Costley

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Coccolobra #2, by Cheryl Costley

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

On the Edge of Darkness, by Maggie Dillon

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

N’awlins Heritage, by Maggie Dillon

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Choices, by Maggie Dillon

Foliage, by Gabriel DiTota

 

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Dots Without the Polka, by Sally Dutko

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Hot Trees, by Suzanne Evenson

Erasing the Future, by Suzanne Evenson

These are just the first few.  Check future posts for more art!

Ellen Lindner

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Fabric Cookies: High Fiber and Calorie Free

Have you ever heard of fabric cookies?  Me neither.  Until I invented them.

I needed a way for a my statewide SAQA group to thank a smaller group, so I asked the state members to make fabric cookies as thank you gifts.  I described them as something, about palm/hand sized made with fabric.  They ran with those loose instructions and came through in spades!  I received 107 cookies, which made a very significant pile.

Fabric cookies on Ellen Lindner's blog: AdventureQuilter.com/blog

They were all very different.

Fabric cookies on Ellen Lindner's blog: AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Fabric cookies on Ellen Lindner's blog: AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Fabric cookies on Ellen Lindner's blog: AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Fabric cookies on Ellen Lindner's blog: AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Here ‘s a closer look at some of them.

Fabric cookies on Ellen Lindner's blog: AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Below, check out the top left cookie.  It was one of TWENTY-SIX sent by Marlene Glickman!

Fabric cookies on Ellen Lindner's blog: AdventureQuilter.com/blog

And, what about the zipper treatment on the heart above?  I love that.

The next photo is not that great, but I think you can tell they’re fortune cookies.  Aren’t they cute?

Fabric cookies on Ellen Lindner's blog: AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The one on the right, below, was one of several I made.

Fabric cookies on Ellen Lindner's blog: AdventureQuilter.com/blog

My cookies were easy.  I just grabbed a few scraps (out of the trash can) and collaged them into loose circle shapes.  I stitched them together and later added hand stitching.  They were very easy and fast.

Fabric cookies on Ellen Lindner's blog: AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Presenting the cookies was lots of fun.  I went to a meeting of the appropriate group.  (We call them pods here in SAQA Florida.)  Several members pitched in to provide brunch which I got to deliver.  Once everyone had their food, I told them about a great homemade dessert that I’d brought for the occasion.  Then, I dumped the entire collection of fabric cookies on the table.  It was quite a pile and it had the appropriate effect of drama and awe.  They were very happy with all of this, and I think (and hope) they felt appreciated.

It’s so wonderful working with dedicated volunteers!  I’m so thankful for those who pitch in.

Ellen Lindner (Florida representative for SAQA, Studio Art Quilt Associates)

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Sharpies and Alcohol

Have you heard about “painting” with Sharpies?  The idea is to draw with a Sharpie on to fabric, and then to apply rubbing alcohol, which makes the color bleed in interesting ways.

Here’s a quick tutorial.

After reading it, I was ready to give it a try.  I used a fine tipped black Sharpie, which bled into purple.

Sharpies and Alcohol. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Sharpies and Alcohol. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Pretty cool, huh?

But, if I try this again, I’d like the design to have more white and less purple.  So, either I’d need to use less alcohol or I’d need to draw the design with more open space.

Still, a successful experiment.  (Also quick and fun.)

Ellen Lindner

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Arranging Improv Blocks

After making about 15 improvisationally pieced units/blocks, it was time to figure out hot to best arrange them.  In the past, I just put them all together and was happy with the result.  So, I tried that first.

Starting an Improv Quilt. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Sure enough, it was lively and energetic.  But, I wondered if the energy was TOO over the top.  Did it just look frenetic?  (Especially with such dramatic colors.)  Would it look better if there were units of plain fabric interspersed with the pieced blocks?

I auditioned the idea on my computer.

Starting an Improv Quilt. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Hmm.  It still had plenty of energy, but it did calm down some.  I decided to go with this plan.

Which meant that my quilt suddenly grew by a factor of about 3!  Heck, it’ll probably be big enough to snuggle under!  When was the last time I made a quilt that size?!? (Answer 2001.)

Back to work adding in plain squares.  So far I’m liking the result.

Ellen Lindner

4

Starting a New Improv Quilt

While making Deliberation I purchased quite a few rust-colored fabrics.  Several of them were purchased online as part of a collection.  So, along with those rust colors, I received many luscious oranges, reds, and fuchsias.  I really liked them and began to plan how I might use them.

I love hand-dyed quilts with many similar colors of the same hue.  I’m not into dyeing, but I suspected I could buy something similar.  And I was right.   Soon, I had a collection of solid and near-solid fabrics in a tight color combination of orange to fuchsia.  Knowing that I’d need some different values and accent colors, I also purchased some neutral browns, as well as yellow-greens and purples with a hand stamped look.

This is what it looked like when I auditioned the combination on my design wall.

Starting an Improv Quilt. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

As you can see, I auditioned them in the proportions in which I intended to use them.  (Very important.)  The major colors are shown in large quantities and the accent ones in small shapes.  I liked the combination so I proceeded with cutting rectangles: largish ones from major colors and small ones from accents.  My plan was to use improvisational piecing, which simply means that no patterns are used.  (See the P.S. note)

Next, I pieced together couples made up of one large and one small piece.  I put them back on the design wall and checked proportions again.  I made some adjustments by sewing a few new blocks, adding some dark neutrals, and trimming down some of the existing ones.  Once I had the proportions to my liking I felt like I could forge ahead without a lot more planning.  Notice that all the seams were curved and many were diagonal.  In the photo below I was just getting started cutting and rearranging the first round of shapes.

Starting an Improv Quilt. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

At this point, I was confident in my plan and ready to get started.  With improvisational piecing it’s great fun to slice into things and sew them back together with a shifted orientation.  Or to insert skinny strips of contrasting colors.  My plan was to do plenty of both.  My idea was to make a bunch of  “blocks,” some with lots of tiny pieces and others with just one alteration.  Then, I intended to let the intricate pieces create a  focal point and to use the simpler pieces around the edges.

This is an example of what I did as I combined and altered two “couples,” making them into one block.

The two couples joined with a horizontal seam:

Starting an Improv Quilt. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Two skinny strips inserted:

Starting an Improv Quilt. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Right side cut and shifted:

Starting an Improv Quilt. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Another skinny insert added.  This one was a scrap from earlier trimming and therefore had two colors in it.

Starting an Improv Quilt. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Two more cuts and shifts added: diagonal and horizontal.

Starting an Improv Quilt. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

A final horizontal shift.

Starting an Improv Quilt. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

This is the final version of the most intricate block.  I won’t square it up any more than necessary.  I’ll leave it like this until I’m ready to join blocks together.  At that point I’ll trim only as needed, but it’s very unlikely that it will end up as a rectangle.

All of this is easy, so it’s quite addicting to slice and alter!

Ellen Lindner
P.S.  There are lots of things online about how to do improvisational piecing, although most of them have to do with straight seams.  I learned from Quilting Arts TV, series 1600 with Pat Pauly.
Here’s a good YouTube video about free cutting and piecing curved seams:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9mIwp8TZtfU 
P.P.S.  My old blog has some info about improvisational piecing, too:
Getting started
Putting blocks together

 

1

“Stitched” Opening

This past weekend I attended the reception for “Stitched:  Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art,” and it was wonderful.  The quilts were beautifully hung and lit in a handsome space.

Viewers were quite intrigued with the work.

"Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art," 2017 exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Nonsynchronous Array, by Sheilana Massey

 

"Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art," 2017 exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Choices, by Maggie E. Dillon

The quilts were made by the Florida members of SAQA (Studio Art Quilt Associates.) Subjects ranged from beautiful florals, to…

"Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art," 2017 exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Crystal Clear and Tis the Season, both by Marianne R. Williamson

political commentary.

"Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art," 2017 exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Left-top: Tribute to Maria of San Ildefonso, by Janice Kreuzinger, Left-bottom: Post Traumatic Stress Demons, by Patricia A. Turner, Right: Erasing The Future, by Suzanne Evenson

Artists had lots of opportunities to talk with one another and with viewers at large.

"Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art," 2017 exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Artwork, L-R: Leather & Lace, Broken Whole, and Star by Choice, both by Michele Sanandajian, Winter Solitude, by Becky Stack, Listening, by Andrea Huffman

"Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art," 2017 exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

L: N’awlins Heritage by Maggie E. Dillon, R: Greenhouse Green Monster, by Doris HulseNotice the red dot on the sign for the right quilt above?  That’s right: it sold – along with 2 others, thus far!

"Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art," 2017 exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

L: Inbox, by Susan Rienzo, C: On the Edge of Darkness, by Maggie E. Dillon, R-top: Vine Ripened, by Ellen Lindner, R-bottom: Sunset Cove, by Karol Kusmaul

"Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art," 2017 exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Top: Hot Trees, by Suzanne Evenson, Bottom: Mangroves, by Pamela Morris, Right: Casual Query #6 or 2nd Amendment Remedy, by Leslie HallThis is a great exhibit of 45 very diverse art quilts.  I hope you’ll get to see it.  It will be on display at Court House Cultural Center, 80 SE Ocean Blvd., Stuart, FL.Hours Tuesday through Friday, 10 – 4, Saturday, 11 – 2.

Ellen Lindner
P.S. I have another piece in the show, “Second Thoughts.”
P.P.S.  Thanks to Karol Kusmaul for  many of these photos.

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