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Final Angel Ornaments

Now that Christmas has passed and all my angel ornaments have found their homes I can show you the rest of them.

First, a couple for friends.  Here’s Jo-Ann’s.

Angel ornament made by Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com/blog
And Susan’s.
Angel ornament made by Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I used recent photos for the two above, but tried to find more vintage photos for the next ones.  On to my sisters-in-law.

Jennifer

Angel ornament made by Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

And Lisa

Angel ornament made by Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Finally, close family.

My sister at about age 12.

Angel ornament made by Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

And my mom at age 32.  Wasn’t she pretty?  (And she still is.)

Angel ornament made by Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com/blog
By this age my mom had four children, ages 6-11!

I’ve had a lot of fun making these ornaments, especially finding the faces to use.  Everyone has loved them.

Ellen Lindner

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Hye Shin Exhibit: Part Two

In the last post I showed you only the artwork displayed in the lobby and the first part of the Ruth Funk gallery.  Now, for the installations.

I’m sorry I don’t recall the title of this first one.  It had to do with blood as the gift of life.  The “bags of blood” had words on them like Strength, Faith, etc.

Hye Shin exhibit on Ellen Lindner's blog. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The pods were made from wire wrapped in thread.  As you can see, the threads from the bags above land nicely in little circles on the paper underlay.

Hye Shin exhibit on Ellen Lindner's blog. AdventureQuilter.com/blog
The center “seeds” of each pod were made with digital images printed onto silk and then applied.

Hye Shin exhibit on Ellen Lindner's blog. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The second installation was called Sunken Dreams.  It is the artist’s reaction to the South Korean ferry accident which killed around 140 people in May of 2014.

Hye Shin exhibit on Ellen Lindner's blog. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The artist is from South Korea so this had quite an impact on her.  (She now lives in Orlando, FL.)

She lined the wall with little woven pouches.  These contained little puffy pillows she had made, with Korean text on each one.  Once again, the pieces had been mounted well away from the wall, playing up the shadows.

Hye Shin exhibit on Ellen Lindner's blog. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

We almost missed these last two pieces, which were completely different.

Hye Shin exhibit on Ellen Lindner's blog. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

We decided that they’re embroidery utilizing a couching technique (where a skinny thread wraps a fatter one, holding it in position.)

Hye Shin exhibit on Ellen Lindner's blog. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

What do you think?  Am I right?

Hye Shin exhibit on Ellen Lindner's blog. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I like the way the couching thread contrasts with the image in many places.

This exhibit is now closed, but I hope you’ll get out to a museum or gallery in your area.

Ellen Lindner

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Hye Shin Exhibit

I really enjoyed Hye Shin’s recent exhibit at the Ruth Funk Center for Textile Arts, in Melbourne, FL.  It was called Light and Shadow, and it was very interesting.  Hye does a lot of weaving, but also makes very sculptural pieces and unique installations.  Her lobby installation was entitled Dandelion Wishes was  and it was my favorite of all the pieces there.

Hye Shin exhibit on Ellen Lindner's blog. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

It was hung well over head height.

Hye Shin exhibit on Ellen Lindner's blog. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Hye Shin exhibit on Ellen Lindner's blog. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Aren’t they cool?  They were hung almost invisibly and they gently swayed and twisted in the breeze from the air conditioner.

As the exhibit title suggested, there was plenty of light and shadow to appreciate.  Most pieces were mounted well away from the wall and well-lit.  This produced interesting shadows, which the artist considers to be part of the work.

Hye Shin exhibit on Ellen Lindner's blog. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The pieces above and below are primarily weavings.  They’ve also been painted and have things like thread caught in between the layers.  Can you see how some areas are fairly sheer and others are mostly opaque?

Hye Shin exhibit on Ellen Lindner's blog. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The piece below was hand stitched on paper.  Cool, huh?

Hye Shin exhibit on Ellen Lindner's blog. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

These are only some of the delights from this exhibit.  In the next post I’ll show you the rest.

Ellen Lindner
P.S. The Ruth Funk Center for Textile Arts always has interesting and unique exhibits.  You may enjoy some of these related posts:
Southern Accentsart quilts from the southeastern members of Studio Art Quilt Associates.
Florida in Fabric II:  Wish You Were Here, art quilts made by Florida artists.
ReDress:  Nancy Judd Upcycled Style, clothing made from discarded items:  everything from glass shards to parachutes and plastic fruit.

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Coastal Progress

A lot has happened with my coastal piece since I last posted about it.  I’ve now added the bulk of the bottom/foreground section.

Ellen Lindner abstracts a coastal view. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

At about this time I began to question how much I really needed to add on the right.  After some consideration, I ended up deleting the far right column.  This is the new reference photo.  I don’t miss the last part on the right, do you?

Ellen Lindner abstracts a coastal view. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

By the way, do you see the blue painters tape on my cutting mat in the photo above?  I added it to indicate my desired dimensions for each block.  It’s proven to be helpful.

I was really happy with the progress at this point.  I wanted to hint at gold grasses in the foreground and it’s turned out about the way I wanted it.  In the photo below, I was auditioning rock fabrics for the right side.  I needed them to provide contrast with the blue water.  But, I didn’t want them to be nearly as dark as the left rocks.

Ellen Lindner abstracts a coastal view. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

First rock:  not bad.

Ellen Lindner abstracts a coastal view. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

As I continued to work on the right side, I spent a lot of time selecting fabrics.  I wanted the right foreground to be fairly dark brown.  But, the far rocks would be grayer.  I spent a while planning how these fabrics would merge, yet still have enough variety to be interesting.

Ellen Lindner abstracts a coastal view. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

It’s getting there!

Ellen Lindner

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Making Angel Ornaments

After seeing some angel ornaments for sale I got the idea of making something similar as gifts.  But my idea was to add the faces of the recipients to their respective angels. Doesn’t that sound like fun?

I painted the bodies red and added a little shading on the sides.  As you can see, these primitive figures have no shoulders or arms.  Which I kinda love.  It will make the angels almost cartoon-like, giving me lots of artistic latitude.

Making angel ornaments. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The halos got a gold leaf treatment.  Don’t you love the way the black underneath shows through?  I think that sort of imperfection adds a LOT of character and interest.

Making angel ornaments. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The wings got a rather “fancy” country-style treatment:  cream paint, stained edges, and lace.  Perfect, I think!

Making angel ornaments. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Before assembling the angels, I spent some time on Photoshop tweaking photographs in order to get heads to the right size, etc.  Here’s my first prototype, with me as the subject.

Making angel ornaments. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Isn’t it a hoot?

I’ve now given away the other three, and I can’t believe I forgot to photograph them first!  But, my friend, Lynn, photographed hers.  As you can see, I tried to match the text to the expression on the face.

Making angel ornaments. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

(This is what she gets for striking such a goofy pose in the original photo!)

These were a lot of fun to make and I’ll be making several more.

What craft/art projects are you doing for Christmas?

Ellen Lindner
P.S.  I ordered the angel kits from retrocafeart.com

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Washed Ashore

While visiting our local zoo, we got to see an art exhibit called “Washed Ashore.”  It featured large animal sculptures made entirely from trash which was found on beaches.  The pieces were quilt large and very impressive.

Washed Ashore Exhibit at Brevard Zoon. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

This puffin gives you an idea of the attention to detail that was used.

Washed Ashore Exhibit at Brevard Zoon. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Gatorade lids add texture to the feet.

Washed Ashore Exhibit at Brevard Zoon. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

It’s all  held together with some sort of stapling.

Washed Ashore Exhibit at Brevard Zoon. AdventureQuilter.com/blog
Sea anemone and other plants.  Can you see how colored items were inserted into plastic bottles and used for the sides?

Washed Ashore Exhibit at Brevard Zoon. AdventureQuilter.com/blog
A big octopus.

Washed Ashore Exhibit at Brevard Zoon. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

And a detail shot.

Washed Ashore Exhibit at Brevard Zoon. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

There were about 8-10 of these sculptures.  Here’s a penguin.

Washed Ashore Exhibit at Brevard Zoon. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Washed Ashore Exhibit at Brevard Zoon. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I was amazed by the skill and CREATIVITY required to build these pieces.  And also, by the vast array of junk that washes up on our shores!

Ellen Lindner

 

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Floral Improv Inaugural Class Scheduled

If you live near Melbourne, FL, you can get in on a really great deal on my new Floral Improv class.  The cost is only $15 because participants will be asked to give me feedback to help me fine tune the class.  Here are the details, along with sample images.

Floral Improv

Class sample for Ellen Lindner's "Floral Improv." AdventureQuilter.com


Want to enhance your artistic skill while making a quick project?  This class will accomplish both.  First, you’ll learn how to make a variety of flowers with no patterns.  After quilting your background, you’ll be ready to create your composition.  With Ellen’s pointers on design you’ll be guaranteed to make a masterpiece.  Finally, you’ll learn a quick technique for facing and finishing your quilt with NO hand sewing!

Your class project will measure about 11″ x 14″ and can be either vertical or horizontal.

Supply List

Class sample for Ellen Lindner's "Floral Improv." AdventureQuilter.com

Boutique 4 Quilters
2945 West New Haven Ave, West Melbourne, FL 32904

Saturday, January 23, 2016

10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.  (with a 30 minute lunch break)

Sign up here

Hope to see you in class!
Ellen Lindner

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$21 Later

I’m not usually an impulse shopper, but every now and then and I get carried away.  Such was the case on a recent visit to thrift shop.  What should I find, but a huge collection of vintage paper doll books!  There were ones from every era, and even political ones, like the Reagans and Clintons.  Too fun!

I immediately have to have them.  (Or at least some of them.)  I bought these, representing the 20’s, 40’s, and 60’s.  That was a pretty good collection, right?

Vintage paper dolls. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Check out some of these wild outfits (and hairdos!)

This looks rather fun, from the 20’s.

Vintage paper dolls. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

But how about this?  And, could you really make your hair do that???

Vintage paper dolls. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Although these books are pretty cool, I’m mildly kicking myself for buying them.  Because, what will I ever do with them?  I don’t work with vintage themes, people, or paper.  What was I thinking?

What would you do with these?

Ellen Lindner

 

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Coastal Piece Continuing

I’m continuing to enjoy working on my quilt which was inspired by the beautiful scenery of California.

Here it is at 14 blocks (plus one in-progress.)

Ellen Lindner abstracts a coastal view. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I’m really happy with the way it’s progressing.

Check out how much the in-progress block, above, changed in the photo below.

Ellen Lindner abstracts a coastal view. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I think I probably sliced and diced that block more than any of the others.  It’s a constant balancing act for me as I make decisions about what to retain (mostly just very general color positions,) and what to abstract.

You may have noticed that many of the blocks have curved edges.  That’s because I’ll probably use curved seams to join them together.  I’m keeping them all a little large and wonky to allow for t hat.

The photo above shows 19 blocks, about half of the number needed.

Oh yeah, I nearly forgot to tell you:  I scorched it!  Controlling all the curved seams requires a good bit of pressing and I apparently over did it.  See how the seam allowances look sorta  yellow?  Yep, I burnt them.  I’m not panicking, though.  Worse case:  I’ll make a new block.  Best case:  I’ll use some of my art products and cover it.  (But, I AM pressing more carefully now!)

How not to press. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Hope you’re enjoying seeing this piece in progress.

Ellen Lindner

See the start of this quilt.

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Coastal Cut Up

Remember the great scenery I saw along the coast of California?  I couldn’t get those strong water colors out of my head and knew I wanted to make a quilt inspired by them.

Ellen Lindner abstracts a coastal view. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Amazing, right?  And, yes, the water was actually that color.

I wasn’t quite sure how I wanted to represent this idea, but I knew I didn’t want it to be overly exact.  I’d have to do some experimenting. But first, I started by auditioning my fabrics.  (It would need some white and black, don’t you think?)   I had many more fabrics in these colors, so I jumped in.

Ellen Lindner abstracts a coastal view. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Remembering the fun I had piecing improvisationally, I wondered if that technique would work here.  I knew I’d need to divvy the project up into units, so I drew divisions on my inspiration photo and got to work.  This was my set up.

Ellen Lindner abstracts a coastal view. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I jumped in and made these six blocks.

Ellen Lindner abstracts a coastal view. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Hmm.  Yes, the colors were working.  And the white inserts added interest.  But, it didn’t have the excitement of crashing waves and rushing tides.  It would need something.

At about this point I had lunch with a friend and showed her In the Moment.  I excitedly told her about improvisational piecing and she wanted to try it.  She showed me some perfectly lovely abstract blocks later and you know what I wanted to do with them?  Cut them up, insert pieces, and rearrange things!  I told her and she actually liked the idea.  A fun conversation.

I came home and looked at my six blocks and then it hit me:  I needed to take my own advice!  I need to slash, insert, and rearrange!  I tackled this with glee and this photo shows 5 of the 6 altered.

Ellen Lindner abstracts a coastal view. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

MUCH better, don’t you think?  I was very excited!  Now, it had the energy I wanted!

I continued on, very loosely copying the color placement of the photo.  I had to keep telling myself, “not exact, not exact, not exact.”  After a few more days I had this.

Ellen Lindner abstracts a coastal view. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Yes!  Now I was getting somewhere!  Can you see that rocky outcrop that’s beginning to appear?  Loving it!

I hope you’ll follow along as I continue with this exciting project.

Ellen Lindner

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