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Making Gun Barrels

Woohoo, the background of my current quilt is finally complete!  Composed and glued and ready for stitching, (but without the green hexie in the center of the photo.)

Making Gun Barrels. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

In the photo above, I was considering adding some hexies to the background.  Just because I’ve been making a lot of them and to give a nod to traditional quilts.  Here’s a better look at them in the sky.

Making Gun Barrels. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

They were kinda interesting, but I eventually decided that they drew attention to the background, making it look overly chunky.  I didn’t think either aspect would help the quilt, so I left them out.

On to making guns. Here’s Ricky’s finished.

Making Gun Barrels. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Actually, I had to tweak it a little.  The grey on the barrel was too high contrast, so I went over it with a little light grey pastel.  Also, I decided that the barrel was not properly aligned with the stock, so I straightened that out. (See the improvements below.)

On to Todd’s gun.  Due to the angle at which they’re holding their guns, the barrel of his appears longer than Ricky’s.

Making Gun Barrels. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I composed the guns onto muslin, with glue.  I think I should have fused them, since some of the pieces are pretty small and could ravel.  Next time.

Don’t they look handsome?  Just like themselves, I think: relaxed and at ease.  Next, I’ll get to place them on the background.  I think their orientation is about right above, but I know I’ll need to do some tweaking.

I’m getting excited with these results!

Ellen Lindner

13

Double Reverse Applique Available for Immediate Download

Have you seen the awesome results that can be achieved with Double Reverse Appliqué?

Like very accurate portraits.

Made using Ellen Lindner's Double Reverse Applique technique. AdventureQuilter.comMarch Journal: Ellen, by Ellen Lindner

Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com

The portrait above was the FIRST thing I ever did with this technique!  That’s how easy it is.

 

Ellen portrait - detail. AdventureQuilter.com

 Now, I have an eBook about this technique, which uses this awesome apple to teach you the concepts.

Learn from Ellen Lindner with an e-book. AdventureQuilter.com

My students and  readers have had really good results with this technique. See what I mean:

Made using Ellen Lindner's Double Reverse Applique technique. AdventureQuilter.com

Baxter, by Diane Hamburg

 

Made using Ellen Lindner's Double Reverse Applique technique. AdventureQuilter.com

by Marge Lehrer

 

Made using Ellen Lindner's Double Reverse Applique technique. AdventureQuilter.com

by Barbara Bilbo

The download is only $9.95.  Find full details here.

Enjoy,
Ellen Lindner

 

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750 Pins Later

I own 750 pins: 3 boxes of 250 each.  But, that wasn’t enough to compose my current quilt!

I use A LOT of smallish pieces of fabrics, so that’s why I use so many pins.

750 Pins Later. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

See what I mean?

Still, I’m very happy with the barns and trees I recently created.

750 Pins Later. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I’m especially pleased with the two trees on the left.  A clean up cloth provided lots of little smudged lines that I was able to manipulate.  I think it works.

750 Pins Later. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

How will I complete my composition without more pins?  Well, I’ll eventually buy more.  But in the meantime, I started gluing things in place in order to free up pins.  I still need to create the grass that’s needed in the foreground.

It seems like this quilt is taking longer than usual, but I should be stitching on it soon.

Ellen Lindner
P.S. This page lists some of my favorite products, including my favorite pins.

6

Corn Fields and Such

After separately creating the two men for my “brothers quilt,” it was time to work on the background.

I finished up the rough draft of the sky and added the far tree line, (with a piece of blue fabric marking a future silo.).

Corn Fields and Such. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Next it was on to the corn field in the foreground. Since the reference photo was taken in November, the corn had already been harvested and the short golden stalks were all that was left.

My Brothers - making faces. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I wanted to create the texture of the messy corn stalks, but not too exactly.  So, I used lots of print fabrics to convey the vegetation.  My plan was to use large scale prints in the foreground, like those shown below, and smaller scaled ones in the background.  I hoped this would add a sense of depth.

Corn Fields and Such. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

It worked, but required a good bit of tweaking. (And a lot of pins!) Here is what I think will be the final corn field, below.

Corn Fields and Such. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Distant fields had much more subtle texture, so I auditioned near-solid fabrics for them.

Corn Fields and Such. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Here they are, complete.  I’m happy with the sense of depth.  That will be enhanced when I add the small buildings in the distance.

Corn Fields and Such. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Next it was time to start adding the green fields and grasses. Here it is, in-progress.

Corn Fields and Such. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I’m getting close to completing the design of this background.  I still need to add the foreground grass and the buildings.  Then, I’ll have to glue it all in place.

FYI, here’s another quilt where I used the scale of fabrics to add to the sense of depth.

Ellen Lindner

6

My Brothers: Clothing

I’m happy with the way the quilt featuring my two brothers is developing.  Here’s my brother Ricky almost complete.

Clothing in-progress. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

After making the face of my other brother, Todd, it was time to work on his jacket.  First, auditioning fabric.

Clothing in-progress. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Here it is, in-progress.

Clothing in-progress. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

All these little pieces were eventually glued to the muslin base and to each other.

Selecting fabrics for Todd’s pants was more challenging. They were sort of Army green; not a color I tend to stock.  My first attempt:

Clothing in-progress. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

No.  I decided the color was too bright.  This was my solution.  Much better, I think.

Clothing in-progress. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Now that I’ve completed the two men I’m just getting started on the background.  I’ll make it much looser, which I’m looking forward to.

So far, I’ve just worked on the sky. Some of it looks a little strong to me, but I’ve learned not to cast judgement until I can see everything together.

Clothing in-progress. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

As you can see in the photo above, I’ve drawn the background fields and barns onto the muslin base.  I’ll reference these as I continue.

Ellen Lindner

11

Heading to the Asheville Quilt Show

Although I’ve never been to the Asheville Quilt Show, my quilts have.  And this year I get to go too!

I’m really looking forward to stopping in on Sunday to see my two quilts on display.

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Vine Ripened, by Ellen Lindner

 

Stitched: Embracing the Quilt as Fine Art. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Second Thoughts, by Ellen Lindner

(And maybe I’ll do some shopping at the vendors too! Hah, “maybe.”  I crack myself up!)  Maybe I’ll see you there.  Here’s the info.

Ellen Lindner

4

Floral Improv on the Coast of South Carolina

I was really impressed with the gals in my recent “Floral Improv” class, in Hilton Head Island, SC.  They caught on quickly and were not intimidated by new concepts.  AND, best of all, they made some GREAT quilts!

Why oh why do I always forget to take in-progress photos?  I guess it’s because I’m staying too busy.  But, I did get a few shots of finished (and nearly finished) quilts as we were cleaning up.

Peg’s quilt is completely finished except for being faced.  Don’t you love the contrast?

Floral Improv in SC. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Donna still has some stitching to do. That will really bring her poppies to life.

Floral Improv in SC. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Although I like to use low contrast leaves and stems for this project, Rosalyn preferred the high contrast of these green stems.  They really add a lot of interest.

Floral Improv in SC. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Judy also finished the stitching on her piece and it’s all ready for facing.  I’m just now noticing the dark centers she added to some of her “daisies.”  I love the way everyone interprets these floral landscapes in their own unique ways.  Improv indeed!

Floral Improv in SC. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Maxine sent me a photo of her finished quilt about two days after the class.  Can you see the bird she added in the lower left corner?  It’s made from what used to be two flowers.  (What was that I was saying about improv?)

Floral Improv in SC. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I think these ladies had a great time and I did, too.  And we all loved each other’s results!
L-R: Rosalyn, Peg, Donna, and Judy

Floral Improv in SC. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Maybe your guild would also enjoy this “Floral Improv” class.  Or one of my other classes.

Ellen Lindner

 

 

2

My Brothers

I’ve been thinking about making a quilt inspired by this photo (composite) of my two brothers.My Brothers - making faces. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I took quite a few photos that day and loosely merged 3 to get this composite.  In the quilt I’ll leave out the extra arm and the clay pigeon thrower.

This will be a special quilt for several reasons.
– My brother Ricky, on the left, is no longer alive.
– It depicts a family tradition: target shooting on the farm after Thanksgiving dinner.
– In shows both brothers relaxed, and in their element.  They are/were both excellent marksmen.
– It will complement an earlier family quilt I made.  I’ve sized it accordingly.
– It relates well to a current call for art titled “Guns:  Loaded Conversations.”

For this project I knew I’d need something I seldom use: a pattern.  At least for the two men. I created it with a combination of computer editing and good old tracing.

My Brothers - making faces. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Next came fabric selection for the faces.  Maybe something like this.  (Or do I need a darker one?)

My Brothers - making faces. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I used the “cutout” filter in Photoshop Elements to help me finalize the pattern for Ricky’s face.

My Brothers - making faces. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

My process was to fuse fabrics for the features, cut out pattern shapes, and fuse/assemble them on parchment paper.  That latter part was new for me and more than once I fused fabric to my pattern instead!

Here’s his finished face and I’m extremely happy with it.

My Brothers - making faces. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

This looks just like him.  So much so that both my sister and mother were startled when they stumbled upon it on Facebook.  Yay!  I think I’m on track.  What do you think?

Ellen Lindner

 

17

At Least I Learned Something

After so much experimentation with paint and collage I was anxious to see if and how it might translate to fabric.  I gave myself this assignment:
– Make 4 small collages, each with paint used at least once.
– Experiment with different ways to get a sheer/transparent effect.
– Start with materials immediately on my work table.
– Start by adding something sheer to every stage.

These were my initial materials, all of which were lying around, (i.e. not properly put away.)  They included some hexies which had been stitched to a background piece of muslin, small fused scraps and sheer fabrics.

At Least I Learned Something. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I cut up the hexies and used them as part of the backgrounds.

At Least I Learned Something. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I expected the finished compositions to be about 5 x 7.  I used a paper frame (above) to help me arrange the hexies for each.  These were my starting compositions.

At Least I Learned Something. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I’ll show you some of what I did.  However, I don’t consider any of them finished.  As a matter of fact, I wasn’t very happy with any of them.  But, I managed to answer my questions, so then I felt find about putting them away.

This is as far as I got on the orange one.  As you can see, a layer of organza greatly obscured the layer below.  It’s also got paint on top of everything you see here.  Except for the little black line which I added with stitching.

At Least I Learned Something. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

This red and green one got a transparent layer with over printing.  I liked that effect.  Yellow lines were fused on and organza was added to the right side only.

At Least I Learned Something. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

This blue one was pretty much a dud.  I added a gridded sheer and then melted parts of it with a heat gun.  I didn’t like the wounds.  I also used heavy stitching as a transparent layer.  It worked pretty well, but was too much work for my liking.

At Least I Learned Something. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

This one was quickly getting overworked and it had questionable color choices.  But, I did like the line I added with two lines of stitching.

At Least I Learned Something. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

And here it is when it got so ugly I couldn’t face it anymore!

At Least I Learned Something. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

With all this ugliness, what did I learn?
– I don’t really like sheer fabrics as translucent layers.  They tend to obscure the lower layers too much.
– I DO like allover printing as a textural/sheer layer.  I can see myself using it again.
– I like adding a black line with machine stitching.  I’d like to explore hand stitching it too.

I think I’ve now well and thoroughly put this episode of exploration to bed.  On to the next thing!

Ellen Lindner

 

10

Online Class with Jane Davies

After getting so much out of Jane Davies’ book about abstract elements I decided to take an online “class” with her.  I put class in quotes, because this was not interactive.  You just download the content and do the exercises on your own.  More like a book – although she does have interactive classes, too.

This was MUCH more challenging, primarily because it involved a lot of – to me – tricky painting techniques I wasn’t familiar with.

The first exercise was easy enough, however: paint a lot of paper in a monochromatic colorway, then combine it in a gridded collage.

An online class with Jane Davies. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I made two.

An online class with Jane Davies. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The ease stopped there.  The next assignment was to make a horizontal collage with different background colors top and bottom.  That part was fine.  But then, I was supposed to sort of merge the background and foreground.  This is what Jane does so brilliantly that is completely foreign to me!

An online class with Jane Davies. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I did 4 of these, with my most successful 2 shown above.  In places, I pulled the color of the collage into the background and in other places I painted a background color onto the collage.  I had no idea what I was doing!  But, it WAS interesting.

Next came an assignment that started with a cruciform composition.  That part was okay, but the quadrants were each supposed to be different, and again, the two were supposed to be merged with paint.  Again, lots of completely random attempts on my part.

An online class with Jane Davies. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

This next 3 examples are so hideous I hesitate to show them to you.  Ugh!

An online class with Jane Davies. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Again, these were cruciforms, with paint added everywhere and then wiped off.  I completely overworked these three!

Finally, it was time to put it all together.  After watching her video twice I was ready to start.  First, I referenced my earlier sample papers showing a variety of ways to make marks with paint.

An online class with Jane Davies. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

For this assignment I followed Jane’s example of painting over every single layer, (until I got to the last few elements.)  Here, the orange circle and the black lines are not painted over.  Everything else is.

An online class with Jane Davies. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Finally, I had a little bit of success I think.

Things I learned:
– I  love the look of partially veiled paint, but I don’t know how to do it.
– I love the idea of foreground and background merging, but I don’t know how to do that with paint either.  Maybe with fabric?
– I continue to be entranced with skinny wild lines, inspired by some of Jane’s work.

Questions going forward:
– Can I get a veiled look with fabric?  Maybe with sheers or overprinting with paint?
– What’s the best way to add those skinny lines to my fabric art?
– Can I successfully  merge both fabric and paint in my art???

You know me: I’ll HAVE to do some more experimenting as I try to answer these questions.  Stay tuned.

Ellen Lindner

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