Tag Archives | Abstract

Project Resurrected

Remember the “project that wasn’t?”  After sketching it I decided not to proceed with it.  My issue was that it looked too jumbled, and therefore didn’t accurately depict the plant that inspired me.

My inspiration photo:The Project that Wasn't. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The initial sketch:

The Project that Wasn't. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

However, I was slow to put the sketch away so it lived on my design wall for a while.  That gave me time to consider it further and I thought, “Why work so hard at making it just an abstract design?  Why not let it look more like the subject?” So, I rearranged my six squares a good bit and came up with this.

Project Resurrected. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

There. That was more like it.  Definitely abstracted, but with the nice curve and drape of a few flower petals.  I was happy enough to continue.

Next came a computer sketch.

Project Resurrected. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Still happy.  Time to audition fabrics.  Starting with “black” for the six backgrounds.

Project Resurrected. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I constructed this piece in a very non-standard way using reverse applique.  That is, I cut the black fabric to the needed shapes, so other fabrics could be tucked underneath. Like this first block, bottom left.

Project Resurrected. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Why use this technique?  One reason: to avoid the black fabric from shadowing through the lighter ones.  Putting black on top got rid of this issue.

From a technical standpoint this worked well.  The only issue is that it was difficult to change my mind, since the first version would be cut before I realized I wanted a change.  Thankfully, my design explorations meant that I needed only a couple of very minor changes.  Whew!

Project Resurrected. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Above, most of the black cuts were done.  Time to audition petal fabrics.

Project Resurrected. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Auditioning is extremely important.  I always tell my students “everything affects every other.”  Which means you can’t make a decision in isolation.  You have to see how each fabric, item, or placement will work with those around it.  For instance, look at the middle two fabrics above, in the left center block.  Can you see that they blend together a little bit?  So, I changed one of them, which you can see below.

Project Resurrected. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The photo above shows the flower petals partially complete.  They were pretty easy to do, since most of the shaping had already been done with the black fabric.

Here the flowers are, complete.

Project Resurrected. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Green leaves and other details would happen soon.  I’ll show you next time.

Ellen Lindner

 

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“For My Own Amusement”

I’ve finished up the series of four pieces made from a stitched indigo sampler.  See numbers one and two here.  And numbers three and four below.

"For My Own Amusement." Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

"For My Own Amusement." Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I love the art paper with the circles, above.

"For My Own Amusement." Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

"For My Own Amusement." Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Piece #2 includes a bit of a dictionary page with the word “amusement” defined.  Since I was doing these just for fun, I thought I could use that word as part of my title.  It came to me very quickly:
“For My Own Amusement, #1-4.”

I like the way the four pieces look together.  What do you think?

"For My Own Amusement." Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Ellen Lindner

14

The Project that Wasn’t

Have you ever lost steam on a project part way through?  This happened to me recently, only I lost interest before I even got started.

After the FUN and success of Bush Berries, I was excited to try another “cut and paste” design.  I started with this photo of a Flame Vine.

Pretty awesome, right?  I decided to cut it into squares, as I had done before and to rearrange the sections.  9 pieces, perhaps?

The Project that Wasn't. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Or, maybe just six.

The Project that Wasn't. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I preferred the six-block option and traced the main lines to get a pattern.

The Project that Wasn't. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The Project that Wasn't. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

It looked a little hodge-podge at this point, so I colored in the values, to see if it looked better.

The Project that Wasn't. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

And, indeed, it did.  As a matter of fact, I thought it looked like a pretty good abstract design.  But, I realized that it no longer depicted the heavy hanging blossoms of the original photo.  And I missed that.

So, I’ve put it aside in lieu of the next thing.
Did I waste my time?  Absolutely not!

As a matter of fact, this time spent designing will help me to be more creative the next time.  And besides, it was fun.  It’s quite possible that I’ll revisit this sketch one day.  Or maybe start again with the same photo and go in a different direction.  No worries.  It’s all part of experimenting.

Have you ever stalled out mid-project?  What are your thoughts on it?  Did you learn something anyway?  (I’ll bet you did.)

Ellen Lindner

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Small Pear Collages

In my last post, I showed you the start of several small pear collages.  I had great fun with them as I continued to work with portions of my original pear picture, vintage linens, papers, and hand stitching.

Here’s the completed version of the one in the last post, Pear Study #1.

Pear Study #1, a small art quilt by Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com/

This is #2 complete.

Pear Study #2, a small art quilt by Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com

#3, complete

Pear Study #3, an art quilt by Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com

And #4, in -progress.  Scroll down to see it completed.

Collage fun. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Pear Study #4

Pear Study #4, an art quilt by Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com

Can you see the piece of the original pear applique used in three out of the four?

I’m very happy with these four small collages and I especially like the way they look together.

Pear Study #1-4, by Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com

Which one is your favorite?

Small works like this often benefit from additional mounting or framing. I’ve got some experience with that and will show you some options in my next post.

Ellen Lindner

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Abstract Piece In-Progress

In my last post, I showed you how I abstracted a photo to create a new design.  This was my computer-colored sketch, although I knew I’d kick up the colors a good bit.

Photo to Abstract. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Soon, I was on to fabric selection.  I spent a good bit of time on this, since I knew the value contrasts would be important.

Abstract Piece In-Progress. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Next, it was time for background construction.

I changed a few fabrics along the way.

When I first finished the background, above, the white curve leaf tip on the left was too attention getting.  However, I knew I’d be adding white with the berries and hoped that they’d all balance out.

On to berries.

Abstract Piece In-Progress. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Yes, the white spots balanced out and I was crazy about those colors!

Time to glue everything together and take it to the machine.  On to quilting!

Ellen Lindner

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From Photo to Abstract

I’ve been having SO MUCH FUN working on my current quilt!  It’s an abstracted design, which always pushes me outside of my comfort zone.  But, I love the way it’s coming together.

First, I needed a design.  I took my cues from a Quilting Arts TV segment featuring Pat Pauly.  She suggested cutting up a photo and rearranging it in order to create shapes and lines for an abstract design.

Okay, then.  This is the photo I chose.

Photo to Abstract. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I cropped it to 7.5″ x 10″ and then cut it into 12 – 2.5″ squares.  I selected my six favorite squares and created a composition with them.  (Thanks to the square shape, the pieces can be easily rotated and still fit together nicely.)

Photo to Abstract. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Gee, I was really loving this!  Next, I outlined the major shapes and traced them.

Photo to Abstract. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Voila: an abstract design which can be worked in any values or colors.  I decided to create it in colors similar to the original photo and I did a little coloring on the computer.
(As you can see, I changed my mind about the orientation.)

Photo to Abstract. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

However, I had leftover “hot” fabric from my last quilt and decided to kick it up with vibrant colors.  Like these.

Photo to Abstract. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

On to the fabric selection!  I can’t wait to show you my progress.  Check back soon.

Ellen Lindner
P.S.  Since I did this design step a while ago, I have an earlier post with a little more info.

 

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Is It Hot in Here or is It Just Me?

As a warm-natured Floridian, I’m often asking “Is it hot in here, or is it just me?”  The hot colors of this quilt made me think of that, so I used my frequent question as the title.

Is it Hot in Here, or is It Just Me? An improvisational art quilt by Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com

Is it Hot in Here, or is It Just Me?

This quilt is larger than most of mine, 54 high x 49 wide.  So large, in fact, I thought it might one day get used for snuggle purposes. With that in mind, I put a binding on it.  (For the first time in about 14 years!)  Of course, I still consider it an art quilt and I added a sleeve for hanging.

Here’s a detail shot.

Is it Hot in Here, or is It Just Me? - detail. An improvisational art quilt by Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com

This quilt was a lot of fun to make!  You can see my in-progess posts in the related links, below.

This piece is for sale.  Find full info here.

Ellen Lindner

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“Deliberation” Complete

My latest artwork, Deliberation, is complete.

Deliberation, an art quilt by Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com

Deliberation

I’m quite happy with it and I really enjoyed creating it.

Deliberation - detail, an art quilt by Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com

I did deliberate (get it – deliberate?) quite a bit over the title.  It does look like an overhead view of rivers and many people suggested titles with that in mind.  That would have been fine, except I wanted to work it into my current series which has titles like Daydream, Brainstorm, etc.  So, I eventually decided on Deliberation.

Audition this art in your home

On to my next adventure.
Ellen Lindner

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Rust with Turquoise Abstract

My latest abstract piece is progressing nicely.  After creating the sketch and selecting fabrics, I began to compose the background on my design wall.

Abstract art quilt in progress. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Here it is, completed.

Abstract art quilt in progress. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Next, I made tracing paper patterns of the two undulating lines I wanted to add.

Abstract art quilt in progress. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

It’s coming along, don’t you think?  I was happy with this design and began to select fabrics for the undulating lines. As usual, I wanted several fabrics for each shape.

Here they are, finished.

Abstract #4 in-progress. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Next, I auditioned the idea of adding skinny undulating lines.  Should they be teal or rust?  I tried out both.

Abstract art quilt in progress. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I drew sketches in the computer and that settled it.

Abstract art quilt in progress. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Not teal.

So, I cut some skinny strips of hand dyed rust and set to work.

Ellen Lindner
P.S. Right now I’m calling this “Abstract #4.”  I definitely need a different way of thinking of this piece, but titles often come to me last.

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