Anyone Want a Victorian House?

Anyone want a Victorian house?  That is, a cross-stitched Victorian house that’s incomplete?

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Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I cross-stitched this many years ago, but eventually lost interest in it.

Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Although I tossed the directions, I saved the house thinking that it could some day be included in a quilt or other collage.  And it definitely could be.  But, I don’t care to do it, so I’m offering it you, my creative readers.

It could be layered with some other incomplete home motifs, don’t you think?  Maybe even some sheer ones?  But, never mind.  You have your own ideas!

If you’re interested in having this piece, tell me in the comments section.  I’ll randomly select a recipient and mail it out.

Put your thinking caps on.  What would YOU do with this?

Ellen Lindner

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Farm Quilt: Adding Barns and Making MORE Changes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I added the barns to my farm quilt and was quite happy with them.

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Ellen Lindner farm quilt in-progress. AdventureQuilter.com

In places I had to modify the trees and sky behind the barns in order to create enough contrast.

Of course, it wasn’t long before I noticed something that needed changing – again.  This time it was the road.  I thought the pattern was too busy.  As a matter of fact, the whole thing had gotten rather busy.  I wanted to depict smooth rolling fields, but I wasn’t quite hitting the mark.  I suspected my busy prints were the problem and began to consider changes.

Yes, that’s better, don’t you think?  The version below has a quieter road and foreground.

Ellen Lindner farm quilt in-progress. AdventureQuilter.com

That was so successful I wondered if other spots needed the same treatment.

Ellen Lindner farm quilt in-progress. AdventureQuilter.com

Yes, they did, (Just below the barns.)

At this point, I was ready to add the large tree that would go on the left.  But wait.  I decided to quilt the background first and to add the tree later. It was time to glue it all in place.

Ellen Lindner
P.S.  But…hmm.  Does that sky need some tweaking on the right side?

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Farm Quilt: Creating Fields

After creating the sky and tree line of my farm quilt, I was ready to tackle the fields.

I drew the main lines and the road directly onto the muslin base with a permanent marker.  After LOTS of fabric auditions, I got started cutting and placing.

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Ellen Lindner farm quilt in-progress.  AdventureQuilter.com

I used some great green fabrics, plus a little bit of yellow for interest.  As originally planned, I used much darker values on the sides.

Ellen Lindner farm quilt in-progress.  AdventureQuilter.com

Lots more auditioning.  Knowing that every decision affects every other, I often tried out a bunch of fabrics at once.  I couldn’t decide seeing just one in place.

Ellen Lindner farm quilt in-progress.  AdventureQuilter.com

I made a few changes.  (Compare the photo below to the one with the red pin cushion above.)

Finally, I was happy with the fields and road and ready to consider the barns.  To do so, I placed tracing paper on the quilt and drew the barns onto it.  This made it easy to get the scale and placement correct.

Ellen Lindner farm quilt in-progress.  AdventureQuilter.com

I used a LOT of trial and error during this process and I made a lot of changes.  All of which slowed me down.  But, it kept me fully engaged and I enjoyed it.

Ellen Lindner

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“As I Watch in Wonder”

Here’s my latest quilt, finally photographed.

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As I Watch in Wonder, an art quilt by Ellen Lindner.  AdventureQuilter.com

I call it “As I Watch in Wonder,” because it reminds me of watching a beautiful sunset, with bare tree branches in the foreground.

To go along with that idea I stitched a large tree branch as part of the quilting.  To mimic little tiny twigs, I added a good bit of hand stitching.  (Click to see better.)

As I Watch in Wonder - detail, an art quilt by Ellen Lindner.  AdventureQuilter.com

This quilt is available for purchase.  See details here.

Ellen Lindner

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Starting the Farm Quilt

Are you familiar with the paintings of Ton Schulten?  He creates vivid color-blocked landscapes, often with darker panels on the sides.

Summer Impressions, by Ton Schulten

Awesome, right?  I thought I’d also like to use darker colors on the sides of my farm quilt, but I didn’t want to copy his format.  Could I make it darker without a vertical line?  I wanted to try it.

I pinned my blue fabrics onto the design wall with the lighter ones in the center and set to work.

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Creating a sky.  Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Since I was making a sky and didn’t want blunt edges, it was tricky merging the values together.  Lots of points seemed to work.

Creating a sky.  Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I’m pretty happy with the result, although I think some tweaking will be in order.  I want the blue silo to be the focal point, so I’ve placed it as a temporary reference.  The sky behind it will need to be very pale in order to create enough contrast.

Creating a sky. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Next came the distant trees.  Since things in the distance tend to have a bluish cast, I thought perhaps I could use blue-green fabrics for the trees.

 

Auditioning fabrics for distant trees.  Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

 

I liked the tree fabrics, but before I could decide on them, I really needed to know how they’d work with the entire color palette.  So, I did some more auditioning, this time paying attention to not only fabric colors, but values.

Auditioning fabrics for fields and trees.  Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I was starting to like this idea.

Ellen Lindner
P.S.  See my design sketch in my previous post.
P.S.S.  DO follow the link and check out Ton Schulten’s magnificent work!

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Designing a Farm Quilt

I grew up on a dairy farm which I’ve photographed quite a bit over the years.  My favorite view is as you’re driving in and you come over a hill.  The farm spreads out before you, with the barns in the distance, and rows of crops on both sides of the road.  And the entire view is framed by a large maple tree.

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Designing a Farm quilt - Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I studied several photographs and came up with a rough sketch.

Designing a Farm quilt - Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

As you can see, I’ve changed the scale in order to enhance what I consider to be the important parts.  I also took some artistic license with the sweep of the road and the placement of some of the barns and silos.  My plan was to make it very stylized with just a few pieces of fabric.

I wanted to make this quilt in very bright colors of blue, green, and yellow.  I thought a yellow sky might be interesting, so I pulled out some fabrics to audition the idea.

Designing a Farm quilt - Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

 Hmm.  I added hints of blue buildings and a blue tree to get a better idea.

Designing a Farm quilt - Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

 Well, the blue silo showed up well, which I wanted.  But, the blue “tree” seemed like it would show up even more, which I didn’t want.  The thing about a wacky idea, such as a yellow sky, is that you never know it’s value until you try it.  You have to audition it visually, and this experimentation is worth your time!

I decided a blue sky would probably be better.  What do you think?

Ellen Lindner

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A Different Kind of Flag

Since my art flags generated so much interest, I’m reposting about something similar:  fabric bombing!

Repost from April 30, 2013

I’ve been bombed!  And it’s a good thing.  That is, I’ve been fabric bombed.  Or more accurately, my yard has.

What is fabric bombing?  It’s a very new thing, following the example of yarn bombing.  With either, a venue is surprised to find their trees, fire hydrants, and other outdoor features have been covered with fabric (or knitting and crocheting.) Often, the installation occured overnight.

Ever since learning about yarn bombing, I’ve been suggesting fabric bombing to my fiber art friends.  They seemed excited about it and we’ve been loosely looking for an opportunity to do it.

Imagine my surprise, then, when I came home and found my yard had been bombed!  Not only that, but several friends pulled into the driveway as I did, there to enjoy “the reveal.”

Click any image for a larger viewoverall-blog

Isn’t it awesome?  Can you see that it wraps around and back on the left?  And the sheer panels hanging from the far tree on the right?  Plus, there’s more obscured by the foreground tree.  Oh my!

I was floored!  How absolutely fantastic!  Things have been challenging for my family lately, and I immediately recognized the fabric bombing as a show of caring and support.  I was so touched!

The entire installation is sorta U shaped, but I’ve created a wonky compilation photo, so you can see the whole thing, below.  (Definitely click on this one, for a better view.  If you have a large window open it will show pretty big.)

composite

My friends really put a lot of effort into this.  Not just in the preparation and hanging of the pieces, but also in the planning.  They solicited fabric from friends who’ve moved away, and scouted out the number of trees in my yard.  I’m completely amazed and touched by all of this.  I feel loved!

All of this looks especially wonderful when a light breeze catches the fabrics, causing them to wave and flair.

There are many stunning details in these pieces, which I’ll share with you in the next post.

Ellen Lindner – who hopes you’re feeling loved today, too!

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Orange Art Flags

Oh, I’ve been having fun making art flags!  Mine are very simple:  orange nylon fabric with orange grosgrain ribbon glued on.  (Which is hard to see in a photo.)

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Art flags by Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog
I was inspired by pojagi, which is Korean patchwork made with translucent fabrics.  Their beauty appears when they’re backlit, and the pattern of the seams becomes evident.  To see if I was achieving the desired effect,  I auditioned them on my kitchen window.  Awesome!  It seemed to be working.

Art flags by Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I joined the five flags a to a long narrow sleeve.  A wire will be threaded through it for hanging.  Next, it was time to try them out in the yard.

Art flags by Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

 Ooh, me likey.  What about the backlit view?

Art flags by Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Yes!  I’m loving this!

Why am I making art flags?  To go here.

F.I.T. Melbourne, FL

This covered walking bridge is on the campus of Florida Institute of Technology, in Melbourne, FL.  It leads from the parking lot to the Ruth Funk Center for Textile Arts, which will be hosting an art quilt exhibit this summer.  So, about a dozen regional SAQA artists will be decking the bridge with art flags.  Won’t that be cool?  I can’t wait to see it!

I know you’ll want to see it, too, so mark your calendar for May 15 – August 22, 2015.  Those are the dates for the Southern Accents quilt exhibit and the flags will be up for the entire time.

BTW, I intended to make these in white, but the white nylon wasn’t quite sheer enough.  Besides, this orange was calling my name for some reason.  (Maybe because of the Central Park Gates from a few years ago?)

Also, I experimented with adding color to the individual sections of the flags, but this made them more opaque.  Not what I wanted.

Art flags by Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Ellen Lindner

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Exhibits and Awards

It’s always fun to show my fabric collages locally.  This past weekend, I got to do it in two different venues.

At the Titusville Art League spring show my Summer in the South won a sponsor award.  How nice!

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Summer in the South, an art quilt by Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com

AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I also got to attend the opening reception for Art Gallery of Viera’s “Text and Textures” show, where I had two pieces on display.  Caring got a prime spot in a well-lit niche.  It was sorta floating away from the wall, which I thought was very effective.

Ellen Lindner with her piece, Caring.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The stained glass piece was made by Eileen Farrell.

My second piece, Rhapsody in Blue Berries, was hung in the opposite niche, (at the bottom.)

Carefree (bottom) by Ellen Lindner.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The painting above it was created by Bobbi Q. Brown.

I really enjoyed visiting with the other artists, talking with art enthusiasts, and meeting new people.

This exhibit is on display through April 5th.

Ellen Lindner
P.S.  Caring is part of a series I made called “Body Language.”  You can see more of these pieces near the bottom of my gallery page.

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Going to the Birds

Is Key West “going to the birds?”  Well, yes, sorta.  There were lots of them!

There were the tropical birds you’d expect.

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Key West birds. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Isn’t this pelican magnificent?  He was very tame and let me get quite close for this shot.  (I did kick up the saturation a bit on this image, but as you’ll see from the others, the water really IS this beautiful aqua color.)

Key West birds. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Key West birds. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Not all the birds were of the tropical variety, however.  These domestic chickens roam freely all over the island.

Key West birds. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

A law protects “free range” birds on Key West and that includes a large number of chickens which have been there for years.  (Click this image to fully appreciate the colors of his plumage.)

Of course, we did see some things besides birds.  Most notable was the lovely turquoise water.  Like that at Bahia Honda State Park.

3b-bahia-honda-state-park

And the rocks and sand bars that could be climbed at John Pennekamp state part in Key Largo.

Key West birds. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Lots of visual stimulation!

Ellen Lindner
P.S.  I think there’s a bird quilt in my future.

 

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