Studio to Gallery Conference

The Studio to Gallery conference was fantastic!  It was a wonderful combination of socializing, seeing great art, fun, and learning about the business side of art.

To kick things off, Sandra Sider gave a very informative speech about selling work in galleries.

Then, we shifted gears as we did some “speed dating.”  Everyone brought business cards and visual aids to introduce themselves.  Each person got 1 1/2 minutes to talk, then a bell went off and it was on to the next person.  After each person at the table had a turn, we switched tables and did it all again.

Click any image for a larger view

Studio to Gallery conference.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Andrea Luliak shows off her postcards to Cathy Heeter and Karol Kusmaul.

Next came the opening for Southern Accents.  [See previous post]

The evening closed with a banquet.  Many volunteers worked to make it beautiful. Area SAQA groups* made the centerpieces, and a group of workers prepped the room.

Studio to Gallery conference.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Weren’t the tables pretty?  The table toppers were hand dyed burlap, each in a different bright color.

Here’s a closer look at that centerpiece.

Studio to Gallery conference.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Each centerpiece sat on an art quilt book.  These later became door prizes, with both the decoration and the book included.

Studio to Gallery conference.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Made by Cathy Heeter

(Sorry, I didn’t get photos of all the centerpieces and I don’t know which groups made each one, either.)

Studio to Gallery conference.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Studio to Gallery conference.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Shaaron Thomas had a great view of the centerpiece on her table.

As you can see, most of the centerpieces were made of fabric flowers.  Plus, there was a sculptural piece and this rather interesting character.

Studio to Gallery conference.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The banquet food and service were excellent, and the company even more so.

Studio to Gallery conference.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Sheilana Massey, Linda Hoffmeister, and Patricia Turner

Studio to Gallery conference.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Victoria Rondeau and Paula Brown

We also had fun distributing “3-1-1″ swap bags.  Those who wanted to, brought 1 or 2 of these bags.  The 3-1-1 name was a play on TSA (“Thread Stitch Addicts”) rules.  Each bag was supposed to have 3 coordinating items, 1 something special, and be contained in a 1 quart bag.

Kay Smith and I had great fun passing these out, with a lot of enthusiasm and silliness.

Studio to Gallery conference.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Ellen Lindner and Kay Smith as TSA (Thread Stitch Addict) ladies

The banquet ended with a special recognition, but I’ll tell you about that in the next post.  In the meantime, here’s a huge THANK YOU to all t he volunteers who made this event so special!

Ellen Lindner

P.S. * Our Florida SAQA region is subdivided into what we call pods.  Yep, we’re pod people.
P.S.S. Related posts:  Southern Accents exhibit (up till mid-August,) Art flags

 

 

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“Southern Accents” Exhibit

The Southern Accents exhibit opened this past weekend in Melbourne, FL, and it’s awesome!

Walking in, I was stopped in my tracks by Barbara Watler’s huge Croton Leaf.  At approximately 10′ high, it REALLY makes an impression!  It’s heavily stitched, which can be appreciated from the second floor mezzanine.  (Which is where this photo was taken.)

Click any image for a larger viewArt by Barbara Watler at the Southern Accents exhibit.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Turning to climb the stairs I stopped again.  What was that?  Could it be?

Southern Accents exhibit.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Yes!  My piece, Crotons, was hanging at the top of the stairs!  What a wonderful prominent position!  (The installation gals at the Ruth Funk Center for Textile Arts do a fabulous job, so I’m guessing it’s no coincidence that two large croton pieces flank the entry space.)

Here’s a better shot, although we couldn’t quite get a straight on photo.

Ellen Lindner with her art at the Southern Accents exhibit.   AdventureQuilter.com/blog

And right next to it was my piece, Crisscross.  

Ellen Lindner with her art at the Southern Accents exhibit.   AdventureQuilter.com/blog

It was inspired by a photo taken in the botanical gardens immediately adjacent to the museum.

Continuing through the gallery, there were lots of delightful pieces, as well as many of the makers.  It was great fun to meet them and talk with them.

Check out Jayne Gaskins with her Land of Cotton.   It’s spectacular!  And it’s made even more so by something that doesn’t show in this photo:  it’s 3D!  Those cotton bolls stick out at least 2″.

Jayne Gaskins with her art at the Southern Accents exhibit.   AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Here’s Nancy “Kay” Smith with her piece, Light the Way to St. Augustine.

Kay Smith with her art at the Southern Accents exhibit.   AdventureQuilter.com/blog

 

Michele Sanandajian’s Floridian Splendor was huge.  Each petal is made of many little pieces of fabric, and shiny bits.

Michele Sanandajian with her art at the Southern Accents exhibit.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog

 

Lisa-Marie Sander’s piece, The Making of a Fossil, speaks to dying sea grass and how it affects the animal habitats.  I’m not sure you can tell in this photo, but the bottom fish is just bones.

Lisa-Marie Sanders with her art at the Southern Accents exhibit.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Marianne Williamson’s Low Tide is collaged, painted, and heavily stitched – in her usual style.  The results of very painterly.

Marianne Williamson with her art at the Southern Accents exhibit.   AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Feeling Energized, by Marti Plager, was one of my favorites.  It’s about the energy she feels as she takes a walk on a perfect day.  I can feel it!

Art by Marti Plager at the Southern Accents exhibit.   AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I also really enjoyed Tide Pools, by Sandra Townsend Donabed.  This is a detail shot.  The yo-yos represent barnacles.  Perfect, I think.

Sandra T. Donabed's art at the Southern Accents exhibit.   AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Here’s a detail image of another quilt.  This one is Carolina Star, by Elaine Tanner.  Weaving pine needles is a common craft in South Carolina, where she lives, and she has used them as her primary design element.  Beads and quilting complete it.

Art by Elaine Tanner at the Southern Accents exhibit.   AdventureQuilter.com/blog

As you can see, this is QUITE the exhibit!  It runs through late August and I hope you get to see it in person.  If not, consider purchasing the catalog, which is only $13, with shipping.  It shows all 60+ quilts, including those by big name quilters like Hollis Chatelain and Arturo Sandoval.

Ellen Lindner
P.S.  If you have trouble with the catalog purchase link, go to www.saqa.com, then SAQA store and SAQA Publications.  The catalog is at the bottom of that page.
P.P.S.  And the hits just keep on coming:  Crisscross has just sold!

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An Abundance of Good Wishes

More art flags!  Part of the installation at Florida Tech, these flags will weather and fray as time goes by.

Click any image for a larger viewArt flags installed on the campus of Florida Tech, Melbourne, FL. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

And that’s part of their charm.  Those in Tibet believe the good wishes put into each flag will come to pass as they age.

Art flags installed on the campus of Florida Tech, Melbourne, FL. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

They may get twisted and askew as the wind whips at them, but that’s all part of an outdoor installation.  My white ones, below, seem to be excelling in this area.

Art flags installed on the campus of Florida Tech, Melbourne, FL. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Many artists included words of encouragement in their creations.

Art flags installed on the campus of Florida Tech, Melbourne, FL. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Art flags installed on the campus of Florida Tech, Melbourne, FL. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

These are on the west end of the bridge.

Art flags installed on the campus of Florida Tech, Melbourne, FL. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Regional members of SAQA (Studio Art Quilt Associates,) came up with the idea for the flags, created them, and coordinated their installation.

Artists: Mary Dyer,  Gabriele DiTota, Regina Dunn, Cathy Heeter, Anita Krug, Ellen Lindner, Mary McBride, Ruth Anne Parker, Sherrill Pryor, Susan Rienzo, Katherine Robinson, Victoria Rondeau,
Lisa-Marie Sanders, Mary Lou Schwinn, Kay Smith

Ellen Lindner
P.S.  You might also like to see the fabric bombing that took place in my front yard.

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Dancing in the Wind

Standing on the bridge, with sunlit tropical foliage all around, the wind kicks up and the flags overhead begin to flutter wildly.  It’s at once both exciting and serene.  A joyful moment!

This was my experience as I took in an installation of art flags.

They went up a few days ago, on the campus of Florida Tech, in Melbourne, FL.  The effect is wonderful!  The 20+ flags are suspended from the cross beams of this charming walking bridge.  Approaching from the parking lot, you’re greeted with a peaceful message on the east end.

Click any image for a larger viewArt flags installed on the campus of Florida Tech, Melbourne, FL.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Flags stretch the full length of the bridge.

Art flags installed on the campus of Florida Tech, Melbourne, FL.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Many artists chose bright colors, like my own orange ones, below.

Art flags installed on the campus of Florida Tech, Melbourne, FL.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Patterns and prints were also popular.

Art flags installed on the campus of Florida Tech, Melbourne, FL.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog

And a few critters.

Art flags installed on the campus of Florida Tech, Melbourne, FL.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The whole thing lifts your spirits.

Art flags installed on the campus of Florida Tech, Melbourne, FL.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog

These flags were made and installed in support and celebration of the Southern Accents art quilt exhibit, which just opened in the adjacent building.  They were loosely inspired by similar flags found in Tibet.  It is thought that the good wishes of each flag come true, as the flags fray and wear.  Isn’t that lovely sentiment?

I LOVE these flags! I hope you get to see them.

Ellen Lindner
P.S.  Here’s a campus map.  Use the search box (top left) and look for the Ruth Funk Center for Textile Arts.  The flags are immediately east.

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Great Results in Mt. Dora

I had so much fun teaching in Mt. Dora, FL!  The first day included a lecture on color and an Instant Art Quilt class.  The next day was devoted to Double Reverse Applique.

The primary project for this class is a dramatic apple.

Click any image for a larger view

Student results in Double Reverse Applique class taught by Ellen Lindner.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog
(I’m embarrassed to report I did not record who made what, nor did I get a picture of every apple completed.)

What’s amazing about this class is the way the apples end up looking so different, even though everyone uses the same pattern.

Student results in Double Reverse Applique class taught by Ellen Lindner.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Check out the green apple below!

Student results in Double Reverse Applique class taught by Ellen Lindner.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The second, optional, project of the day was a matching pear.

Student results in Double Reverse Applique class taught by Ellen Lindner.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog

In the photo above, my flash ruined the effect, but the top background fabric is purple and iridescent gold.  The purple makes the yellow-green really pop.  (Complementary colors, you know.)

Equally exciting for me was getting to see two completed projects from students who took a Design Your Own Nature Quilt class from me several months earlier.

Donna completed this quilt, which is a compilation of  views from her back yard.  Makes me want to visit!

Student results in a Design Your Own Nature Quilt class taught by Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

See her inspiration photos on an earlier post.  You’ll see that she did a great job!

Betty worked from a challenging photo showing sunlight streaming through a forest.  She used tulle to create a wonderful hazy light.

Student results in a Design Your Own Nature Quilt class taught by Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

See her inspiration photo in an earlier post.  Didn’t she do well?

I DO so appreciate it when students show me their completed work!  As soon as I see it I remember all our conversations about various decisions.   The student’s are thrilled with their results and I AM TOO!

Ellen Lindner
P.S.  I’d love to come teach for your guild, or “meet” you in my online classroom.  Check out the information for live classes and lectures, as well as online ones.
P.P.S.  Design Your Own Nature Quilt sill start, online, on June 26th.  Find info here.

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Instant Art Quilts in Mt. Dora

When is an out-of-focus quilt still beautiful?  When it’s one of the awesome Instant Art Quilts made by members of the Lake County Quilt Guild.  Like this in-progress one made by Joan.

Click any image for a larger view

Student results from Instant Art Quilt class taught by Ellen Lindner.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog
What’s an Instant Art Quilt?  It’s one in which a beautiful hand dyed fabric has been torn and then rearranged, with little contrasting accents added.  They’re dramatic and beautiful!

Sandy E. used a striped fabric which produced a very linear design.  (Can you tell she likes LOTS of color?)

Student results from Instant Art Quilt class taught by Ellen Lindner.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Three students used the same exact fabric!  This is Donna’s version, in-progress.

Student results from Instant Art Quilt class taught by Ellen Lindner.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog

And here’s Anita’s.  As you can see, she decided to go with a road trip theme.  See her finished quilt in the IAQ student gallery!

Student results from Instant Art Quilt class taught by Ellen Lindner.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog
My apologies to Shan, who also used this same fabric.  My camera battery was quite low and the photo of her quilt ended up as just a blur of colors.

Pat got creative with her accents and they really POP!  Can you tell that many of these quilts are already quilted (before the end of the 3-hour class?)

http://www.adventurequilter.com/e-Learning/Online_Classes/IAQ/Student_IAQ.html

And Betty’s colors are sizzling!  (My poor photo shows part of her quilt hanging off the edge of the table.)

http://www.adventurequilter.com/e-Learning/Online_Classes/IAQ/Student_IAQ.html

Joyce used a lovely fabric, which is not done justice by my fuzzy photo.  She decided on two accent fabrics and I like them both.

http://www.adventurequilter.com/e-Learning/Online_Classes/IAQ/Student_IAQ.html

Sandy-2 and Kelly also used the  same fabric.  Here’s Sandy’s, with the quilting complete.  Isn’t it gorgeous?

http://www.adventurequilter.com/e-Learning/Online_Classes/IAQ/Student_IAQ.html
I recommended an angular quilting pattern, in order to catch the fabric edges.  Plus, I love to see a big zig-zag out in the middle of nowhere.  It shows off the straight lines and also allows a way to change alignment when quilting.

Finally, here’s Kelly’s quilt, finished.  Quilted, faced, and with the sleeve attached! (I teach quick ways to do those tasks, but the class isn’t THAT instant!  She did the facing and sleeve later.)

http://www.adventurequilter.com/e-Learning/Online_Classes/IAQ/Student_IAQ.html

In the photo above, she was considering beads, etc.  (And, I think her quilt is actually supposed to be vertical.)

Can you tell we had fun in this class?

Ellen Lindner
P.S.  Would your group enjoy a 3-hour or 6-hour version of this class?  More info here.

 

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“Oak Green Farm” Complete

My farm quilt, Oak Green Farm, is now complete.

Click any image for a larger view

Oak Green Farm, an art quilt by Ellen Lindner.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog

It depicts the farm where I grew up, and where my parents still live.  Very little has changed over the years:  rolling fields, sunlight reflecting off the metal barn roofs, and that big maple tree.

Oak Green Farm, an art quilt by Ellen Lindner.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog

This scene is full of memories for me:  walking home from the bus with my siblings, eating wild strawberries on the road banks, and singing to a group of very curious cows.  (I still think they liked it.  Surely!)

Oak Green Farm, an art quilt by Ellen Lindner.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog
The scenery was idyllic then and it still is now.

Ellen Lindner
P.S.  My quilt, Carefree, depicts another scene on this same farm road, this time looking the other direction, and with the next generation of kids.

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Farm Quilt: Home Stretch

After completing the sky and fields, I quilted everything in place.  Next, I pinned the barns into position.  I didn’t stitch them yet, because I thought the tree might affect the placement.

I spent quite a bit of time trying out fabrics for the tree.

Click on any image for a larger view

Oak Green Farm - in progress.  An art quilt by Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I needed the fabrics to be dark enough to show up against the fields and sky, but not so dark as to draw all the attention.

Oak Green Farm - in progress.  An art quilt by Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I was finally happy with the tree, but I made the tallest silo a little darker, to make sure it would have the highest value contrast, thereby being the focal point.

Oak Green Farm - in progress.  An art quilt by Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I briefly considered darkening the road and auditioned the idea with black organza.  I thought it sort of took over, so I decided against it.

Finally, I was ready for the last bit of quilting and finishing touches.

Ellen Lindner.

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A Purple (and Red) Heart

I’ve been helping Jayne Gaskins and Nancy Billings work on the upcoming Studio to Gallery conference.  Boy, have they worked hard!

When Jayne had a major computer issue recently, I joked that she deserved a purple heart.  And then I decided to make her one.

Click any image for a larger view

Fabric heart made by Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Of course, Nancy also deserved recognition, so I made her a red one.

Fabric heart made by Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I sent them in the mail and they were quite happy with them.

They only took a few hours (or as I count things, 3 TV shows.)  Making them was a fun way to show my appreciation and to add a little lightheartedness to our conference prep.

Ellen Lindner
P.S.  It is not my intention to make light of those who have earned actual Purple Hearts.  I have great appreciation for all our service men and women.

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That Fabric!

Wow, I knew I was lucky to get those wonderful silk fabrics from Judith Content, but I didn’t know how lucky until I pinned them up on my design wall!

This is the very first pin up.  Totally random, right out of the bag.

Click any image for a larger view

Fabric from Judith Content arranged on Ellen Lindner's design wall.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Can you say awesome?  And these pieces are big, too.  About 4′ tall.  These fabrics practically auto arrange themselves into a design.

Well, even though I had another quilt I was working on, I just HAD to play with my new fabrics some.  Who among us could resist?

Here’s the first arrangement, using about half of the pieces.

Fabric from Judith Content arranged on Ellen Lindner's design wall.  AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Oh yeah.  This is going to be fantastic.

Must resist.  Must resist.  Must finish barn quilt.  Must finish barn quilt.

Ellen Lindner

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