100% Pure Florida

If you’re in the Melbourne, FL area you’ll want to be sure to see the 100% Pure Florida exhibit which will be on display August 30 – October 1, at the Fifth Avenue Art Gallery.

100% Pure Florida exhibit flyer.

 

My piece, Florida Native #1, will be part of the show.

Florida Native #1, a fabric collage by Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com

Florida Native 1

I’ll be at the opening on September 2nd and I hope to see you there!

Ellen Lindner

 

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Another Abstract Underway

As you’ll see, I’m still working in the same series.  I’m loving the colors and the motifs.

This is the sketch for the current piece.

An abstract art quilt in-progress. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

And here’s the background, more or less complete.

An abstract art quilt in-progress. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Or so I thought.  But, after studying it for awhile, I decided it was too pastel for my liking.  It wasn’t bad, but it wasn’t exciting me.

This is the second background.  The largest shape changed from mostly orange to mostly rust, and the background pale peach changed to soft orange.  I like this much better, even though the changes are subtle.

An abstract art quilt in-progress. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Now what?  I auditioned the motifs I was considering.  Here you see digital versions added to the existing background.

An abstract art quilt in-progress. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I thought the white squares showed up well, and set to work adding them.  (This time, I remembered to stop and fuse the fabrics first.)

Ellen Lindner

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So, I Whacked the Corner Off

In my previous post, I showed you a big orange/rust blob on my current quilt that needed to be dealt with.  Eventually, I decided just to whack it off.  Like this.

I Whacked off a Corner. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Knowing that I’d need to attach new batting before continuing, I put the batting under my quilt before cutting into it.  That way, the batting had exactly the same edge shape as the portion removed.  I butted it up next to the quilt and hand basted them together.

I Whacked off a Corner. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Then, I recollaged the corner and was MUCH happier with it.

I Whacked off a Corner. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Finally, I stitched all the squares in place.  (Did you notice the ones in the background too?)  I also did some undulating stitching around the flower petals.

I Whacked off a Corner. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

And this is where is stands:  completely finished except for facing, etc.  I started doing that and realized it’s TOO SMALL for the exhibit I had intended to enter it in.  Oh no!  So, I quickly switched gears and started on the next quilt, leaving this one to wait for my attention.

Oh well.  I’m just thankful I have time to do another one!

Ellen Lindner

 

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Exploration and Detours

I guess it’s a good thing making a quilt takes a while because I find that I often get new ideas while implementing the previous ones.  Such has been the case with my current abstract quilt.

I left a large orange/rust shape in the top left corner, planning to balance it with something large and orange in the lower right.  Maybe something like this.

An abstract art quilt under way, by Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

But first, I wanted to get my flowers into place.  I had planned to use one large open flower, but that turned into two.  In the photo below, I was putting them in place.

Explorations and Detours. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

They blend in with the background more than I had hoped, so I’ll add some orange outline stitching, or something along those lines.

While working on the flowers, however, I had time to think about that big orange shape and I thought I could do something more interesting.

I’d been noticing that I really liked paintings with lots of tiny squiggles and shapes in them.  I wondered how I could get that effect with fabric.  I decided I could just cut shapes and sprinkle them about.  So, I tried a few to get the effect.

Explorations and Detours. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I really liked that, so I went for broke.

Explorations and Detours. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Oh yes!  I love it!

But, this definitely doesn’t balance the big corner blob.  I’ll have to do something about that.

Will I need to completely remove that big rust shape, or can I just shrink it? I auditioned the latter in this next photo.

Explorations and Detours. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I’m not sure yet.  But, I’m having fun exploring options and taking detours!

Ellen Lindner

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Dirty Dozen Fiber Art Exhibit

Have you made it to see the Dirty Dozen Fiber Artists’ current exhibit, yet?  For those of you in the Melbourne, FL area, there’s still time to do so.  The show continues through August 30th at the Eau Gallie library.

See these two previous posts for lots of images: One and Two.  It’s really worth a stop, I think.

I have three pieces in the show.

Caring

Caring, an art quilt by Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com

I’m especially proud of this piece, and the others in my Body Language series.  Because they’re mounted on acrylic they’re hard to ship.  Therefore, I’m always happy to have an occasion to show them locally.

Taking Flight

Taking Flight, an art quilt by Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com

This quilt was made from scraps given to me by Judith Content.  Isn’t she generous?

Urban Sprawl

Urban Sprawl, an art quilt by Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com

Urban Sprawl 2005

I’m pretty proud of this one, too.  Mostly because of the courage it took to make it.  I was quilting it when I decided it just wasn’t exciting enough.  I finished quilting it with a radical course in mind.  Eventually, I did some VERY extreme making over to get this result.  You can read about it here.

While you’re checking out art quilt exhibits, you may also want to visit the two currently on display at the Ruth Funk Center for Textile Arts.  See earlier posts about them.

Lots to see in Melbourne!
Ellen Lindner

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“A View Within”

A View Within is an art quilt exhibit currently on display at the Ruth Funk Center for Textile Arts, in Melbourne, FL.  It features the work of Paula Chung and Karen Rips.  Paula likes to interpret MRIs and other medical images in her work.  Karen has riffed off the same images and ideas but in her own unique way.  It’s interesting to see two different interpretations of the same subject.

This is Mary III, by Paula Chung.  Can you see the purple jaw and the yellow teeth?

A View Within exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Her pieces are VERY heavily machine stitched.  Amazing, right?

A View Within exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Karen, on the other hand, took an entirely different approach to the subject with her piece Teeth.  If you look closely, you’ll see the vertical stitched teeth shapes.

A View Within exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

When Paula depicted an MRI of the head and neck in neutral colors, Karen created this piece, Road Trip.

A View Within exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The close up view is amazing, because the entire piece is heavily puckered into rows and rows.  It’s a very interesting and appealing texture.

A View Within exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

These are just a few of the images from this exhibit.  It will be on display, along with the Radical Elements exhibit through August 27th.

Ellen Lindner
P.S.  While you’re checking out art be sure to check out the Dirty Dozen Fiber Artist’s exhibit on display at the Eau Gallie library.  See earlier posts for images.

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Two Art Quilt Exhibits

We’re very lucky to have the Ruth Funk Center for Textile Arts right here in Melbourne, FL.  This is a state of the art facility which brings in extraordinary textile exhibits all throughout the year.

Every summer they host an art quilt exhibit.  Right now they have two:  Radical Elements and A View Within.

Radical Elements is a juried invitational* exhibit, curated by the great folks at SAQA (Studio Art Quilt Association.)  It’s all about the elements of the periodic table.  Each artist got to select the element she wanted to use and then made work appropriate to that element.  Artists were encouraged to use very non-traditional materials.

This is Chromium, by Diane Melms.  It’s composed of artists’ canvases that have been painted and stacked.  It definitely pushes the definition of a quilt, but this sort of thing is allowed per the SAQA definition of a quilt.

Radical Elements exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Trisha Hassler selected iron as her element.  She calls her piece
The Irony of it All Was Not Lost on Her.

Radical Elements exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

She used a wide variety of materials, including steel and snake skin!

Radical Elements exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Mary Pal did one of her wonderful cheesecloth portraits to portray Albert Einstein.  She calls it
Elements of Surprise.

Radical Elements exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Darkness Into Light II is the title for Grace Harbin Wever’s piece.

Radical Elements exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

It has really wonderful details.

Radical Elements exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Chloros was a very interesting piece by Martha C. Hall.  As you can see, it’s double layered with holes cut in the front layer.

Radical Elements exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I think Martha must have had fun collaging paper and other items to create the first layer.

Radical Elements exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

This exhibit will be on display through August 27th.  I hope you get the chance to see it.

In the next post I’ll show you images from the second show.

*(I’m not sure my term”juried invitational” is exactly correct.  What I mean is that people apply to be invited, without actually making any work.  If the juror likes their portfolio they’re invited to make a piece specifically for the exhibit.)

Ellen Lindner
P.S.  If you want to see more of what the RFCTA offers, click on Old Blog above and in the search box type “Ruth Funk.”  You’ll find a wealth of posts about exhibits there.

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Fiber Art in Melbourne, FL

The public library in Eau Gallie, (Melbourne) FL has beautiful views of the Indian River, and now, beautiful views of  art made by the Dirty Dozen Fiber Artists.  (She says unashamedly.)

Here are some more photos of the exhibit.

Fiber art exhibit in Melbourne, FL. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Pieces on this wall (starting top left and going clockwise) were make by Dij Pacarro, Susan Rienzo, Terri, Drake, and Jill Brown.

One of the spaces available to us was a small study room.  Unfortunately, we had to hang the work while a tutoring session was going on!  Thankfully, they were very gracious (and complimentary.)

The wall and door have large glass panels so people can see in, but that glass made it hard to get a good photo without a reflection.  Here’s my best shot.

Fiber art exhibit in Melbourne, FL. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Clockwise from the people on the right, these quilts were made by me, Laura Ruiz, Laura again on the barely visible piece, and Dij Pacarro for the last two.

You wouldn’t think the copy corner was a great place to display art, but it was one of the larger spaces and very visible.

Fiber art exhibit in Melbourne, FL. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The left side of the wall is shown above.  Starting with the wolf and going clockwise, these were made by Terri Drake, Gabriele DiTota, Elizabeth King, and Gabriele again.

The right side of the wall is shown below.  The smallest quilt  was made by Elizabeth King, and I made the other two.

WEB - copy room right

A pretty great display, right?  I’m SO delighted to be part of this group.  We learn from one another, challenge one another, and have fun doing it!

The exhibit will be up through August 30th.  I hope you get to see it.  Here’s the info: Eau Gallie Public Library, 1521 Pineapple Ave., Melbourne, FL.  It’s open every day except Sunday.  See full hours in previous post.

Ellen Lindner
P.S.  If you want to see better pictures of my three exhibit pieces, use these links:
Caring
Taking Flight
Urban Sprawl

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Hanging an Exhibit in Melbourne, FL

It always takes longer than you expect when hanging a show.  But, thanks to an efficient crew, the recent installation of our Dirty Dozen Fiber Arts show went very smoothly.

Our exhibit is at the Eau Gallie library, in Melbourne, FL.  It’s a nice building with a wall of windows looking out on palm trees and the Indian River.  A wonderful setting.

Fiber art exhibit in Melbourne, FL. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

See what I mean?  Here’s a better view of the quilts shown above.

Fiber art exhibit in Melbourne, FL. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The largest piece was made by Ruth Anne Parker.  Jill Brown made the ice cream cone and Terri Drake created the bottom piece.

Rudy Pacarro, Laura Ruiz, and I did most of the ladder climbing, while Dij Pacarro and Andrew Lindner guarded quilts and managed signs.

Fiber art exhibit in Melbourne, FL. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Fiber art exhibit in Melbourne, FL. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

These quilts are on the most visible wall, near the doorway.

Fiber art exhibit in Melbourne, FL. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Starting with the largest quilt and going clockwise, these pieces were made by Laura Ruiz, Susan Rienzo, Gabriele DiTota, Jill Brown, collectively: Dij Pacarro, Jill Brown, Paula Furgason, and Peggy Horsfield, and the last one was made by Susan Rienzo.

The exhibit will be on display through August 30th.  I hope you get to visit it.  Here’s the info:
Eau Galllie Public Library, 1521 Pineapple Ave., Melbourne, FL.

Hours of Operation
Sunday            CLOSED
Monday          12:00PM – 8:00PM
Tuesday            9:00AM – 5:00PM
Wednesday     9:00AM – 8:00PM
Thursday          9:00AM – 5:00PM
Friday                9:00AM – 5:00PM
Saturday           9:00AM – 5:00PM
I’ll have more pictures for you in the next post.

Ellen Lindner
P.S.  There’s a “poke-stop” (is that what it’s called) just outside the library.  It was very popular.

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“Ray Turner: Population”

You wouldn’t think that three galleries of “head shot” portraits would be that interesting.  But, it really was.  In the hands of painter Ray Turner, each person not only looks different, but in many cases, their personalities shine through.

This grouping was on the main wall at the Foosaner Art Museum, in Melbourne, FL.

Can you see how the background colors shift slightly?

"Ray Turner: Population" exhibit in Melbourne, FL. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

As with every exhibit he does, the center column and center row are portraits of local “celebrities” and museum personnel.  The very center portrait is of Anthony Cantanese, the  outgoing president of our local college.  To the left are his wife and the incoming president.  You get the idea.

"Ray Turner: Population" exhibit in Melbourne, FL. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The portrait below was photographed from several feet away.

"Ray Turner: Population" exhibit in Melbourne, FL. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

It was intriguing to come in close and notice the details.  There was quite a bit of texture in the paint.  Also, because each portrait was painted on special glass that’s 3/8″ thick each one had  an unexpected depth, as well as a shadow.

"Ray Turner: Population" exhibit in Melbourne, FL. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The artist also experimented with how little information he could provide and still have the face be recognizable.

He tried one with no color.

"Ray Turner: Population" exhibit in Melbourne, FL. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

And another with just a little yellow.

"Ray Turner: Population" exhibit in Melbourne, FL. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Could you tell that both of those last two were the same person?  I’ll bet you could.  It’s amazing how little information is really needed to convey an idea.

I always enjoy a visit to an art museum.  I hope you’ve been able to visit one or two this summer.

Ellen Lindner

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