“Shootin’ the Breeze” Finished!

Whoo-boy, the quilt of my brothers ended up taking quite a bit longer than I anticipated, but I’m very happy with the finished result.

Shootin' the Breeze, an art quilt by Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com
I got to show it to my family in the almost-complete stage, and they LOVED it.  That was very gratifying.

Shootin' the Breeze art quilt in-progress. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Here are few detail shots.

My brother Ricky.

Shootin' the Breeze - detail, an art quilt by Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com

My brother Todd.

Shootin' the Breeze - detail, an art quilt by Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com

Quilting faces was new to me, and rather intimidating.  I studied the work of Hollis Chatelain and am very happy with the end result.  (However, if I ever do faces again, I’ll use clear thread, rather than changing the thread colors throughout.)

As you can see, the quilting added a lot to the 3D aspects of the clothing, too.

Shootin' the Breeze - detail, an art quilt by Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com

I feel like I haven’t had much to show on my blog for a while, except for this quilt.  So, to all my faithful readers, thanks for your patience!  Now, I can have fun with other things (like mobiles) and share new adventures with you.

Ellen Lindner
P.S. I’ve entered this piece in an exhibit called “Guns: Loaded Conversations.”  If accepted, it will tour for three years.

 

 

10

Making a Mobile

A few months ago I was playing around with paint quite a bit and using a lot of palette paper.  You’re probably familiar with it.  It’s sorta waxy, so it can handle a lot of moisture.

Often, the paint dried in interesting ways, so I decided to save the papers.  (Yep, I did it again: saved something I had no idea how I’d ever use.)

This week I had some down time, so I cut out the paint blobs.

Making a mobile with paint blobs. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

See what I mean about them being interesting?

Making a mobile with paint blobs. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I thought maybe I could make them into a mobile.  All white or with color?  I decided on a mixture.

At some point I had heard that you should build a mobile from the bottom up and that was good advice. I used button twist (heavy thread) and started knotting and threading shapes on. I let the bottom shapes dangle, but I wanted the others to hang semi parallel to the floor.  With that in mind I tried to puncture each piece at the center of gravity.  (One of my aviation terms, simply meaning balance point.)  This sometimes took more than one try.

Making a mobile with paint blobs. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

After adding a piece, I’d make a small knot a little ways down the thread an add the next shape.  I kept the colorful side facing down, since I knew it would be viewed from below.  ( I did a lot of lifting to look up at my progress.)

I used short pieces of plastic straws as my cross structures, again finding the center of gravity for each one before adding it to item above.

Making a mobile with paint blobs. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I think it turned out pretty cool.

Making a mobile with paint blobs. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

One thing I didn’t anticipate was the mobile moving.  And that’s the best part!  It’s sorta like visual wind chimes.  (Only better.)

What experimenting have you tried lately?

Ellen Lindner

 

8

Blending Layers with Photoshop Elements

Oh my, have I had fun.  After reading an article by Sharon Carvalho in Quilting Arts magazine, I started playing with blending layers in Photoshop Elements.  First, I selected three images for experimentation.  My bottom layer was the result of a painting experiment.

Blending Layers in Photoshop Elements. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Next came a  layer of messy text. Although it seems to be written on a white background, the background is actually transparent.

Blending Layers in Photoshop Elements. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

For the top layer, I used a snippet of another painted sampler.

Blending Layers in Photoshop Elements. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Then, I just started trying out many different types of blends, as selected on the layers drop down window/menu.  (My PSE is version 7, which is quite old.  I believe more up to date versions call this Blending Mode.)

Blending Layers in Photoshop Elements. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

And just look what happened! “Hue” completely changed – and amped up – the colors.

Blending Layers in Photoshop Elements. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

“Soft light” played up totally different features.  The colors are more expected but the large circle has almost disappeared.

Blending Layers in Photoshop Elements. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

“Screen” produced a sort of soft neon effect.

Blending Layers in Photoshop Elements. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Check out “multiply”.  It seems to have stirred the colors together, getting mostly mud.

Blending Layers in Photoshop Elements. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

“Lighter” played up the lighter elements and completly omitted the darker ones.

Blending Layers in Photoshop Elements. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

“Exclusion” resulted in dramatically duller colors.

Blending Layers in Photoshop Elements. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

But, check out “difference,” which created very unexpected colors and turned the text different colors.  Pretty cool , right?

Blending Layers in Photoshop Elements. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

“Color burn” produced another color surprise. Suddenly, there was a stack of horizontal lines on the right.  Had you noticed those before?

Blending Layers in Photoshop Elements. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The “luminosity” selection merged the colors and almost completely hid the text. It was one of the few effects that showed the squiggly black line.

Blending Layers in Photoshop Elements. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Gee, this was fun!  Now, what am I planning to do with these images?  Honestly, probably nothing.  But, they were just so much stinking fun that I’ll definitely have to play like this again. The author of the article I read prints her results to fabric and uses them in her quilts.  That’s rather pricey, of course.  What if I printed one pretty large (online) and made it into a whole cloth quilt?  And maybe added some interesting hand and machine stitching?  Now THAT sounds like fun.  I’m almost giggly at the thought.

What wackado crazy effects do you like in Photoshop Elements?

Ellen Lindner

 

6

Dancing In the Wind

This was originally posted May 19, 2015.  I thought you’d enjoy seeing it again.

Standing on the bridge, with sunlit tropical foliage all around, the wind kicks up and the flags overhead begin to flutter wildly.  It’s at once both exciting and serene.  A joyful moment!

This was my experience as I took in an installation of art flags.

They went up a few days ago, on the campus of Florida Tech, in Melbourne, FL.  The effect is wonderful!  The 20+ flags are suspended from the cross beams of this charming walking bridge.  Approaching from the parking lot, you’re greeted with a peaceful message on the east end.

Art flags installed on the campus of Florida Tech, Melbourne, FL. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Flags stretch the full length of the bridge.

Art flags installed on the campus of Florida Tech, Melbourne, FL. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Many artists chose bright colors, like my own orange ones, below.

Art flags installed on the campus of Florida Tech, Melbourne, FL. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Patterns and prints were also popular.

Art flags installed on the campus of Florida Tech, Melbourne, FL. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

And a few critters.

Art flags installed on the campus of Florida Tech, Melbourne, FL. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The whole thing lifts your spirits.

Art flags installed on the campus of Florida Tech, Melbourne, FL. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

These flags were made and installed in support and celebration of the Southern Accents art quilt exhibit, which just opened in the adjacent building.  They were loosely inspired by similar flags found in Tibet.  It is thought that the good wishes of each flag come true, as the flags fray and wear.  Isn’t that lovely sentiment?

I LOVE these flags! I hope you get to see them.

Ellen Lindner
P.S. This post is on my old blog.  There’s tons of good stuff on it, if you haven’t looked at it before.
P.P.S. Here’s another post about the art flag installation.

7

Getting Close

I’m FINALLY winding down on the quilt featuring my brothers.  It’s not ready for a full photograph yet, but here are the two faces.  I spent  A LOT of time on these and I’m happy with them.

Close detail of facial features. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

My brother Todd

 

Close detail of facial features. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

My brother Ricky

I plan to show the quilt to some of my family members this week.  I know they’ll love it.

Ellen Lindner

0

Making Gun Barrels

Woohoo, the background of my current quilt is finally complete!  Composed and glued and ready for stitching, (but without the green hexie in the center of the photo.)

Making Gun Barrels. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

In the photo above, I was considering adding some hexies to the background.  Just because I’ve been making a lot of them and to give a nod to traditional quilts.  Here’s a better look at them in the sky.

Making Gun Barrels. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

They were kinda interesting, but I eventually decided that they drew attention to the background, making it look overly chunky.  I didn’t think either aspect would help the quilt, so I left them out.

On to making guns. Here’s Ricky’s finished.

Making Gun Barrels. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Actually, I had to tweak it a little.  The grey on the barrel was too high contrast, so I went over it with a little light grey pastel.  Also, I decided that the barrel was not properly aligned with the stock, so I straightened that out. (See the improvements below.)

On to Todd’s gun.  Due to the angle at which they’re holding their guns, the barrel of his appears longer than Ricky’s.

Making Gun Barrels. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I composed the guns onto muslin, with glue.  I think I should have fused them, since some of the pieces are pretty small and could ravel.  Next time.

Don’t they look handsome?  Just like themselves, I think: relaxed and at ease.  Next, I’ll get to place them on the background.  I think their orientation is about right above, but I know I’ll need to do some tweaking.

I’m getting excited with these results!

Ellen Lindner

13

Double Reverse Applique Available for Immediate Download

Have you seen the awesome results that can be achieved with Double Reverse Appliqué?

Like very accurate portraits.

Made using Ellen Lindner's Double Reverse Applique technique. AdventureQuilter.comMarch Journal: Ellen, by Ellen Lindner

Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com

The portrait above was the FIRST thing I ever did with this technique!  That’s how easy it is.

 

Ellen portrait - detail. AdventureQuilter.com

 Now, I have an eBook about this technique, which uses this awesome apple to teach you the concepts.

Learn from Ellen Lindner with an e-book. AdventureQuilter.com

My students and  readers have had really good results with this technique. See what I mean:

Made using Ellen Lindner's Double Reverse Applique technique. AdventureQuilter.com

Baxter, by Diane Hamburg

 

Made using Ellen Lindner's Double Reverse Applique technique. AdventureQuilter.com

by Marge Lehrer

 

Made using Ellen Lindner's Double Reverse Applique technique. AdventureQuilter.com

by Barbara Bilbo

The download is only $9.95.  Find full details here.

Enjoy,
Ellen Lindner

 

0

750 Pins Later

I own 750 pins: 3 boxes of 250 each.  But, that wasn’t enough to compose my current quilt!

I use A LOT of smallish pieces of fabrics, so that’s why I use so many pins.

750 Pins Later. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

See what I mean?

Still, I’m very happy with the barns and trees I recently created.

750 Pins Later. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I’m especially pleased with the two trees on the left.  A clean up cloth provided lots of little smudged lines that I was able to manipulate.  I think it works.

750 Pins Later. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

How will I complete my composition without more pins?  Well, I’ll eventually buy more.  But in the meantime, I started gluing things in place in order to free up pins.  I still need to create the grass that’s needed in the foreground.

It seems like this quilt is taking longer than usual, but I should be stitching on it soon.

Ellen Lindner
P.S. This page lists some of my favorite products, including my favorite pins.

6

Corn Fields and Such

After separately creating the two men for my “brothers quilt,” it was time to work on the background.

I finished up the rough draft of the sky and added the far tree line, (with a piece of blue fabric marking a future silo.).

Corn Fields and Such. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Next it was on to the corn field in the foreground. Since the reference photo was taken in November, the corn had already been harvested and the short golden stalks were all that was left.

My Brothers - making faces. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I wanted to create the texture of the messy corn stalks, but not too exactly.  So, I used lots of print fabrics to convey the vegetation.  My plan was to use large scale prints in the foreground, like those shown below, and smaller scaled ones in the background.  I hoped this would add a sense of depth.

Corn Fields and Such. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

It worked, but required a good bit of tweaking. (And a lot of pins!) Here is what I think will be the final corn field, below.

Corn Fields and Such. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Distant fields had much more subtle texture, so I auditioned near-solid fabrics for them.

Corn Fields and Such. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Here they are, complete.  I’m happy with the sense of depth.  That will be enhanced when I add the small buildings in the distance.

Corn Fields and Such. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Next it was time to start adding the green fields and grasses. Here it is, in-progress.

Corn Fields and Such. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I’m getting close to completing the design of this background.  I still need to add the foreground grass and the buildings.  Then, I’ll have to glue it all in place.

FYI, here’s another quilt where I used the scale of fabrics to add to the sense of depth.

Ellen Lindner

6

My Brothers: Clothing

I’m happy with the way the quilt featuring my two brothers is developing.  Here’s my brother Ricky almost complete.

Clothing in-progress. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

After making the face of my other brother, Todd, it was time to work on his jacket.  First, auditioning fabric.

Clothing in-progress. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Here it is, in-progress.

Clothing in-progress. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

All these little pieces were eventually glued to the muslin base and to each other.

Selecting fabrics for Todd’s pants was more challenging. They were sort of Army green; not a color I tend to stock.  My first attempt:

Clothing in-progress. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

No.  I decided the color was too bright.  This was my solution.  Much better, I think.

Clothing in-progress. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Now that I’ve completed the two men I’m just getting started on the background.  I’ll make it much looser, which I’m looking forward to.

So far, I’ve just worked on the sky. Some of it looks a little strong to me, but I’ve learned not to cast judgement until I can see everything together.

Clothing in-progress. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

As you can see in the photo above, I’ve drawn the background fields and barns onto the muslin base.  I’ll reference these as I continue.

Ellen Lindner

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