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Hand Stitching Hexies

Although I seldom do any hand stitching on my quilts, I like to have a hand  project available for traveling, etc.  I’ve searched for something that will hold my interest –  for years.  First I tried yo-yos. Then small collages.  Finally, I decided to revisit hexies (or hexagons.)

Hand Stitching Hexies. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

These are traditionally used in English paper piecing, something I learned WAY back when.  I wasn’t sure I wanted to hand join the hexies together, but I found that I quite liked making them.  And don’t they look pretty when grouped by color?

After making a few, I began to experiment with how to easiest join them. They’re created on templates of card stock /”paper,” which is generally not removed until after they’re sewn together.  I wondered if there was some other way to stiffen them, so the card stock templates could be removed.  I tried heavily starching them, and they had plenty of body.  So, I gave it a try, appliqueing the hexies onto a plain background, and securing them with a zigzag stitch worked in invisible thread.

It worked really well, although all those passes to catch every edge took longer than I expected.

Hand Stitching Hexies. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I did a lot of stopping and starting to avoid double passes with the stitching.  Next time, I think I won’t worry about that and it will be much more efficient.

Eventually it occured to me that since I wanted a hand sewing project, I should at least try hand joining them.

Hand Stitching Hexies. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

And, sure enough, it worked fine.  Templates are removed only after all the surrounding seams are in place.  The holes help when removing the “paper.”  You just stick a chop stick or dull pencil in there and pry it out. I made my own templates and used a hole punch to make the holes.

Hand Stitching Hexies. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

So, then I wondered if I could hand stitch them without the templates, if I starched them heavily again.  I’m still working on the sample for that, and I think it’s going to work just fine.

Hand Stitching Hexies. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Hand Stitching Hexies. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I’m not at all sure what I’ll be doing with these.  I’m pretty sure I’ll use them in coordinating colors, perhaps as a background for a future design.  In the meantime, making them is a fun way to dip into my scrap collection.

This little project came in handy on a recent flight, (even though the tray table was TINY.)

Hand Stitching Hexies. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Just what I needed.

If you want to try your hand at these, here are a few tutorials and tips:
– An easy to cut template (that I used.)
– Making hexies
– Joining hexies

Ellen Lindner
P.S. I also tried making hexies from circles.  The technique is easy, but I found that they weren’t very accurate, which made joining them unfeasible.  They’d still work well for applique, however.

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Starting My Red Bud Quilt

After coming up with  a design for my quilt, it was time to select some fabrics.

Designing a Red Bud Quilt. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

My computer generated sketch is shown above.  I decided to fracture the sky quite a bit in order to give the impression of busy twigs, etc.  The lower part would be mostly one fabric, though.

So, I dug into my stash of blues, to see if I had what I needed.

Starting My Red Bud Quilt. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I crack myself up.  Of course I did!

Next, I put a piece of muslin onto my design wall and drew in the desired dimensions.  Then, I drew in the tree, along with some dotted lines for fractured sky pieces.

Starting My Red Bud Quilt. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

When the first piece went in I was so excited!  I got quite a little Adrenalin surge!

Ellen Lindner

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Designing a Red Bud Quilt

After viewing blooming Red Buds in Virginia in April, I was inspired to make a quilt.  I thought I’d have a difficult time depicting them from a distance, so I decided to feature their blossoms close up.  To that end, I took a bunch of photos.

Designing a Red Bud Quilt. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Gorgeous, right?

Designing a Red Bud Quilt. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Designing a Red Bud Quilt. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Designing a Red Bud Quilt. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Designing a Red Bud Quilt. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I think it’s so interesting the way the blossoms pop directly out of the bark.

I spent quite a bit of time merging and resizing photos on the computer and finally came up with this as a sketch.

Designing a Red Bud Quilt. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The sky and branches should be pretty straight forward, but what about those blossoms?  I think some experimenting will be in order.

Ellen Lindner
P.S. Check out some of the other flowers I’ve created in this gallery.

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Elliott Museum Exhibit: Part Two

More images from the Elliott Museum in Stuart, FL with an exhibit that showcases the heritage of quilts, as well as the current genres.

This piece by Louise Hall was mounted on black.

Elliott Museum Quilt Exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

This octopus by Pam Post attracted lots of attention.  The suckers were 3D.

Elliott Museum Quilt Exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Linda Ludemann’s cranes were also very popular.

Elliott Museum Quilt Exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

And here I am with my piece Ti Plants A-Glow-Glow.  There was a very interested docent who asked me lots of questions about it.  Among other things, I told her how I jagged cut many of the pieces to give an unpredictable organic feel.

Elliott Museum Quilt Exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

In addition to fabric quilts, this exhibit includes several pieces that reference quilts and quilt designs.  Like this miniature quilt store.

Elliott Museum Quilt Exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

And then there’s this.  A nice historical quilt, right?  Well, yes, but that’s not the artwork.  The bed is!

Elliott Museum Quilt Exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

On closer inspection, you can see that Angela Scozzari, the artist, has stacked five rusted box springs for this piece.  The quilt is merely staging.

Elliott Museum Quilt Exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Another of her pieces was made up of rusted panels arranged on the floor in a grid. She was also invited to show several other works.

Elliott Museum Quilt Exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

As you can imagine, the fiber artists in the group were of mixed opinion on her pieces.  However, everyone agreed that they were very interesting.

This is a very nice exhibit, but it only runs through July 15th.  If you want to see it don’t delay!  Need more reasons to visit? The museum includes a large collection of antique cars and other vehicles and machines.  Plus, it’s RIGHT AT the beach.  There’s something for everyone.

Ellen Lindner

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Elliott Museum Quilt Exhibit

I recently attended the opening of a quilt exhibit in a very nice museum, the Elliott, in Stuart, FL.

Elliott Museum Quilt Exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The exhibit shows the progression from traditional and utilitarian quilts to art quilts and even includes some pieces that PUSH the definition of quilt.

The exhibit space is pretty large.  Here, you can see about 2/3 of it.

Elliott Museum Quilt Exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The exhibit runs loosely chronologically from left to right.  These older quilts are either owned by the museum, or submitted by the relatives of the makers.

Elliott Museum Quilt Exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The large quilt  below was made by the grandmother of Cathy Heeter.  Then, Cathy used it as inspiration for a smaller one, shown at left.

Elliott Museum Quilt Exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Very cool, right?

Elliott Museum Quilt Exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Continuing around the room, there were several quilts that bridged the gap between traditional quilts and abstract art.

Elliott Museum Quilt Exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

These three pieces were made by Linda Ludemann and were inspired by pansies.

Elliott Museum Quilt Exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Then, some representational quilts.  The top trio were made by Michele Sanandajian.  And the bottom five by Luanne Carson.

Elliott Museum Quilt Exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Gabriele DiTota created a vibrant 3D piece.

Elliott Museum Quilt Exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Elliott Museum Quilt Exhibit. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I’ll show you more images in the next post, as the quilt story unfolds.  (You’ll even see something fairly controversial.)

This is a very nice exhibit, but it only runs through July 15th.  If you want to see it don’t delay!  Need more reasons to visit? The museum includes a large collection of antique cars and other vehicles and machines.  Plus, it’s RIGHT AT the beach.  There’s something for everyone.

Ellen Lindner

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“Growth” Part Three

These are the final pieces that make up the “Growth” exhibit, currently on display in Dunedin, FL.  As you can see, the Florida members of SAQA (Studio Art Quilt Associates) are very talented!

This piece by Susan Rienzo was front and center.

Growth: Part Three. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Doris Hulse made this piece, which includes references to Alice in Wonderland and other fairy tales.

"Growth" Exhibit in Dunedin

Gabrile DiTota used little girls dresses as a resist on her work, below right.

The two pieces on the left were made by (top) Gail Cassaday, and (bottom) Leslie Cohen.  You can probably tell that the lower piece references a hurricane.  Something we’re all too familiar with here in Florida.

"Growth" Exhibit in Dunedin

Gayle Wolfe’s piece, “WAGACA” is shown below.  The title stands for “What goes around comes around.”

"Growth" Exhibit in Dunedin

The pieces below were made by (top) Kathryn Robinson, (bottom) Regina Dunn, (left) Linda Hoffmeister.

"Growth" Exhibit in Dunedin

And, finally, these two pieces were made by (L-R) Ellen Nepustil and Barbara Watler.

"Growth" Exhibit in Dunedin

Actually, looking at my catalog I see that I neglected to get photographs of three more pieces made by these artists: Karol Kusmaul, Maya Schonenberger, Patricia Turner.  My apologies, ladies.

I think you’ll enjoy this exhibit.  Especially since THREE other art quilt exhibits are also on display in this arts center!  Especially delightful is Karol Kusmaul’s “Shirt Tales” exhibit, consisting of 47 fabric portraits.  Karol uses primarily thrift store fabrics, which add a wonderful folksiness.  Here’s a sneak peek.

Artwork by Karol Kusmaul. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

As you can see, her pieces are hand stitched.

Artwork by Karol Kusmaul. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blo

I know the top one is her dad and I believe the bottom left one is, too.  They’re so narrative: personal, yet universal at the same time.

These exhibits will be up all summer, through August 18th.  Find full details here.

Ellen Lindner

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“Growth” Exhibit: Part Two

Continuing with the great art included in the “Growth” exhibit, these pieces (L-R) were made by Annette Boncek and Marianne Williamson.

"Growth" Exhibit in Dunedin

The piece on the left, below, is one of my favorites, by Maggie Dillon.  The one on the right was made by Jann Warfield.

"Growth" Exhibit in Dunedin

(L-R) these 2D pieces were made by Becky Stack, Gretchen Brooks, and Loreen Leedy. The 3D piece in the foreground was sitting on a pedestal and it was made by Annette Boncek.

"Growth" Exhibit in Dunedin

"Growth" Exhibit in Dunedin

Here’s a close up view of the inside.

"Growth" Exhibit in Dunedin

Maya Schonenberger created this lovely piece.

"Growth" Exhibit in Dunedin

And here’s another Barbara Watler piece, also with heavy stitching.

 

"Growth" Exhibit in Dunedin

One of my favorite pieces in the show was this one, by Pam Lowe.

"Growth" Exhibit in Dunedin

I really like the round shapes against the ripples of vertical hand quilting.

"Growth" Exhibit in Dunedin

I’ve now shown you all the quilts hanging on the outside perimeter of the room.  But, there’s still more to see!  In the next post, I’ll show you the pieces hanging on the interior partition.

Ellen Lindner
P.S. I’d love it if the artists shown would comment on this post and tell us more about their pieces, (including titles.)

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“Growth” at Dunedin Fine Arts Center

I sure had fun attending the opening reception for “Growth”, in Dunedin, FL.  It was held at the Dunedin Fine Arts Center.  It’s a beautiful facility with TONS of activities.

"Growth" Exhibit in Dunedin

This is the view as you first step into the gallery.  Impressive, right?  It’s hard to tell in this photo but the walls are a very dark and deep blue-green.

"Growth" Exhibit in Dunedin

The piece front and center was made by Susan Rienzo. All pieces were made by Florida members of SAQA, and specifically selected for this exhibit by juror Pamela Allen.

Working around the room, these are the first pieces you come to.  Starting top left and going clockwise, they were made by Patricia Turner, Cathy Daffinee Heeter, Susan Lumsden, and Becky Stack.

"Growth" Exhibit in Dunedin

Artists were asked to interpret the theme of growth in a variety of ways: urban, social, personal, organic, etc.  I think the juror did a great job  including a wide range of pieces.

Starting top left and going clockwise, the pieces below were made by Karol Kusmaul, Patricia Turner, and Suzanne Evenson.

"Growth" Exhibit in Dunedin

This piece was made by Barbara Watler, and was created entirely by stitching.  (All HAND stitching, I think.)

"Growth" Exhibit in Dunedin

Check out this detail shot. Amazing, right?

"Growth" Exhibit in Dunedin

The left piece below was made by Loree Jackson.  The two on the right were made by Bobbi Baugh.

"Growth" Exhibit in Dunedin

And here’s mine, on the left.  Top to bottom, the two pieces on the right were made by Susanna Hotchkiss and Pamela Morris.

"Growth" Exhibit in Dunedin

Here I am with my piece Dancing Toward the Sun.

"Growth" Exhibit in Dunedin

Thus far I’ve only shown you about 1/3 of the pieces in this exhibit.  More to come in future posts.

Ellen Lindner
P.S. I’d love it if the artists shown would comment on this post and tell us more about their pieces, (including titles.)
P.P.S. There’s a lovely catalog for this exhibit, featuring all the pieces.  Purchase info.

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