Tag Archives | Paints and Markers

Revamping Artificial Flowers

I have a white “silk” orchid that was very realistic looking when I purchased it several years ago.  Over time, however, it has yellowed badly.

Revamping Artificial Flowers. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Revamping Artificial Flowers. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I considered several ideas about how to best revamp these pretty petals.  Eventually, I decided just to paint them, with ordinary acrylic paint.

Revamping Artificial Flowers. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

This worked well.  I left the fiddly centers yellow and was happy with the results.

Revamping Artificial Flowers. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Revamping Artificial Flowers. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Not bad, right?  No one’s going to think they’re real, but they’re definitely pretty.

What have you painted lately?

Ellen Lindner
P.S.  What I really wanted to do was to decoupage black and white fabrics onto the petals.  It only took a little experimenting to realize that would be too difficult.  But if I ever create some from scratch?  Who knows.

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Trying New Things

Do you like to try new things?  I do.  Especially as they relate to art and quilting.  Whether it’s a tool, a technique, or a color palette, I consider experimenting with such things to be adventures.  (As a matter of fact, that’s why I call my website Adventure Quilter.)

I recently discovered a new white pen.  It’s permanent and it works pretty well on fabric.  One coat is sort of faded looking, but two passes make a nearly opaque mark.

Trying New Things. Ellen Lindner, AdventurQuilter.com/blog

The pen is called Uniball Signo broad tip.  (The last is a misnomer, since the tip is about like that of an ordinary ink pen.)  Note:  The pen doesn’t cover quite as well as in this photo.

Do you have one of those favorite t-shirts or sweaters that’s so comfortable you want to wear it no matter how ratty it gets?  I have a t-shirt like that, which has been developing holes.  They finally got bad enough that I decided to do something about them.  Namely, mend them in a rather exaggerated way.

Trying New Things. Ellen Lindner, AdventurQuilter.com/blog

I enlarged the holes, patched them with contrasting fabric scraps and embroidered around them.  Now, I sorta feel like I’m wearing an odd work of art.  And I like it.

Have you done any creative mending?

Ellen Lindner

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Making Angel Ornaments

After seeing some angel ornaments for sale I got the idea of making something similar as gifts.  But my idea was to add the faces of the recipients to their respective angels. Doesn’t that sound like fun?

I painted the bodies red and added a little shading on the sides.  As you can see, these primitive figures have no shoulders or arms.  Which I kinda love.  It will make the angels almost cartoon-like, giving me lots of artistic latitude.

Making angel ornaments. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The halos got a gold leaf treatment.  Don’t you love the way the black underneath shows through?  I think that sort of imperfection adds a LOT of character and interest.

Making angel ornaments. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The wings got a rather “fancy” country-style treatment:  cream paint, stained edges, and lace.  Perfect, I think!

Making angel ornaments. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Before assembling the angels, I spent some time on Photoshop tweaking photographs in order to get heads to the right size, etc.  Here’s my first prototype, with me as the subject.

Making angel ornaments. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Isn’t it a hoot?

I’ve now given away the other three, and I can’t believe I forgot to photograph them first!  But, my friend, Lynn, photographed hers.  As you can see, I tried to match the text to the expression on the face.

Making angel ornaments. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

(This is what she gets for striking such a goofy pose in the original photo!)

These were a lot of fun to make and I’ll be making several more.

What craft/art projects are you doing for Christmas?

Ellen Lindner
P.S.  I ordered the angel kits from retrocafeart.com

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InkTense Blocks

Have you tried InkTense pencils and blocks yet?  They’re water soluble ink in either pencil or block form and I’ve been seeing them on all sorts of quilts.  I got a chance to play with the blocks recently and they were a ton of fun.

My first experiment was to test their “smear-ability,” or how much they’d bleed.  I sprayed the top 2/3 of my fabric with water and used Aloe Vera gel to moisten the bottom 1/3.  Then I drew over both parts with the end of the blocks, as well as with the blocks laying flat for lots of coverage.

Working with InkTense blocks. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com

As you can see, the water areas bled pretty well and the Aloe Vera part did not.  Good to know.  Now, I can select the best one based on the desired results.

Next, I dipped the end of a block into water and drew on dry fabric. The amount of saturated color that comes from these blocks is amazing!  As soon as my mark looked dry, I’d wet the end again and continue.  The end just sort of melted into wonderful ink.  It was very cool, and this was the result.

Working with InkTense blocks. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com

Finally, I tried blending colors directly onto wet fabric.  Hmm, that was much less controllable.  It bled more than I wanted, so then I decided to encourage bleeding by adding more water.  Yep, it bled alright.  Finally, I drew a design on, trying to control what I had.  Not too successful, I’m afraid.  But, that’s why I was experimenting.

Working with InkTense blocks. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com

When I’m on the ball I remember to write notes about my techniques directly onto my samples.

I’ve heard a lot about the InkTense inks being permanent once dried.  So, I added the step of heat setting these samples and set out to see if all of this was true.  It turns out:  not so much.  Here’s the cotton swab after rubbing it over my dry sample – in the area where water was used.

Working with InkTense blocks. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com

It seems like a lot of color, but maybe it wouldn’t be enough to transfer.  So I tried it.  It’s subtle, but it did transfer.  (This actually shows up more in person.)

Working with InkTense blocks. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com

 So, what about the area with the aloe vera?  What would that do?

Working with InkTense blocks. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com

Same thing.  I think these are still very viable for use on quilts, but it’s good to know what their properties really are.

What have you experimented with lately?

Ellen Lindner

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