Swapping ATCs

Of course, the reason for making artist trading cards it to swap them!  And that’s just what I did with a talented group of SAQA (Studio Art Quilt Associates) members  from south Florida.

These are the nine cards I received.

Artist Trading Cards. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog
What a collection!  These women are pretty fearless.  They used a lot of surface design techniques, including painting, thread painting, melting, gluing, and hand stitching.

Here are some closer views.

Artist Trading Cards. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

A wide variety of materials was skillfully employed by these artists.  Can you identify the orange open-weave item in the left card above?  Yep, it’s from a produce bag.  Great texture and contrast!

Both of the cards below used glued paper, among other things.

Artist Trading Cards. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

It was great fun trading ATCs and generally celebrating the holidays with these women!

Ellen Lindner
P.S.  SAQA is an excellent organization.  Find more info here.  (I’m biased, but I think the Florida members are especially talented, active, willing to help, and fun to hang out with!)

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Making ATCs (Artist Trading Cards)

Did I tell you about meeting a woman on an airplane who later sent me some upholstery fabric samples?  It all started while I was “arting” on a cross-country flight.  I was sketching and playing with paints and she was knitting.  Of course, it didn’t take long before we were talking about our respective projects, and it turned out that she was a quilter.  We exchanged contact info and it wasn’t long before a NICE selection of sheer upholstery samples showed up at my door.  How thoughtful!

Making Artist Trading Cards. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I love sheers with textures.  Since I had recently agreed to make an artist trading card, I thought some of these delicate fabrics would be just perfect.  (Then I found out I needed to make TWELVE of them!  Oh well, at least I had the fabric I needed.)

Not familiar with artist trading cards?  They’re small cards about the size of a credit card:  2 1/2 x 3 1/2.  As the name implies, artists make them and trade them.

I decided on silk burgundy and cotton cream fabrics to showcase these sheers.

Making Artist Trading Cards. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The gridded sheer fabrics made excellent backgrounds against the deep burgundy colors.

Making Artist Trading Cards. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

For each one, I layered a textured sheer piece that covered most of the card.  Next I added a small piece of cream fabric.  Then, I cut a motif from the sheer fabric and added it on top.  These were accented with a little bit of black  fabric.  Finally, I stitched around the motifs with black thread.  I did it in a kind of messy/sketchy style.

This one was my favorite, and I sent it to my new airplane friend.  (It was number 13.)

Making Artist Trading Cards. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Here’s another one close up.

Making Artist Trading Cards. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I added silk on the back, too.  Since it ravels badly I burned the edges with a soldering iron.  That took a while.

Making Artist Trading Cards. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Here’s the whole collection.  I was pretty happy with them and they were (mostly) fun to make.

Making Artist Trading Cards. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I swapped these for a very intriguing collection.  I’ll show you those in the next post.

Have you ever made ATCs?  Which one is your favorite above?

Ellen Lindner
P.S.  See my soldering/melting set up here.

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Final Angel Ornaments

Now that Christmas has passed and all my angel ornaments have found their homes I can show you the rest of them.

First, a couple for friends.  Here’s Jo-Ann’s.

Angel ornament made by Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com/blog
And Susan’s.
Angel ornament made by Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I used recent photos for the two above, but tried to find more vintage photos for the next ones.  On to my sisters-in-law.

Jennifer

Angel ornament made by Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

And Lisa

Angel ornament made by Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Finally, close family.

My sister at about age 12.

Angel ornament made by Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

And my mom at age 32.  Wasn’t she pretty?  (And she still is.)

Angel ornament made by Ellen Lindner. AdventureQuilter.com/blog
By this age my mom had four children, ages 6-11!

I’ve had a lot of fun making these ornaments, especially finding the faces to use.  Everyone has loved them.

Ellen Lindner

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Hye Shin Exhibit: Part Two

In the last post I showed you only the artwork displayed in the lobby and the first part of the Ruth Funk gallery.  Now, for the installations.

I’m sorry I don’t recall the title of this first one.  It had to do with blood as the gift of life.  The “bags of blood” had words on them like Strength, Faith, etc.

Hye Shin exhibit on Ellen Lindner's blog. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The pods were made from wire wrapped in thread.  As you can see, the threads from the bags above land nicely in little circles on the paper underlay.

Hye Shin exhibit on Ellen Lindner's blog. AdventureQuilter.com/blog
The center “seeds” of each pod were made with digital images printed onto silk and then applied.

Hye Shin exhibit on Ellen Lindner's blog. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The second installation was called Sunken Dreams.  It is the artist’s reaction to the South Korean ferry accident which killed around 140 people in May of 2014.

Hye Shin exhibit on Ellen Lindner's blog. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The artist is from South Korea so this had quite an impact on her.  (She now lives in Orlando, FL.)

She lined the wall with little woven pouches.  These contained little puffy pillows she had made, with Korean text on each one.  Once again, the pieces had been mounted well away from the wall, playing up the shadows.

Hye Shin exhibit on Ellen Lindner's blog. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

We almost missed these last two pieces, which were completely different.

Hye Shin exhibit on Ellen Lindner's blog. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

We decided that they’re embroidery utilizing a couching technique (where a skinny thread wraps a fatter one, holding it in position.)

Hye Shin exhibit on Ellen Lindner's blog. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

What do you think?  Am I right?

Hye Shin exhibit on Ellen Lindner's blog. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I like the way the couching thread contrasts with the image in many places.

This exhibit is now closed, but I hope you’ll get out to a museum or gallery in your area.

Ellen Lindner

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Hye Shin Exhibit

I really enjoyed Hye Shin’s recent exhibit at the Ruth Funk Center for Textile Arts, in Melbourne, FL.  It was called Light and Shadow, and it was very interesting.  Hye does a lot of weaving, but also makes very sculptural pieces and unique installations.  Her lobby installation was entitled Dandelion Wishes was  and it was my favorite of all the pieces there.

Hye Shin exhibit on Ellen Lindner's blog. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

It was hung well over head height.

Hye Shin exhibit on Ellen Lindner's blog. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Hye Shin exhibit on Ellen Lindner's blog. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Aren’t they cool?  They were hung almost invisibly and they gently swayed and twisted in the breeze from the air conditioner.

As the exhibit title suggested, there was plenty of light and shadow to appreciate.  Most pieces were mounted well away from the wall and well-lit.  This produced interesting shadows, which the artist considers to be part of the work.

Hye Shin exhibit on Ellen Lindner's blog. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The pieces above and below are primarily weavings.  They’ve also been painted and have things like thread caught in between the layers.  Can you see how some areas are fairly sheer and others are mostly opaque?

Hye Shin exhibit on Ellen Lindner's blog. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The piece below was hand stitched on paper.  Cool, huh?

Hye Shin exhibit on Ellen Lindner's blog. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

These are only some of the delights from this exhibit.  In the next post I’ll show you the rest.

Ellen Lindner
P.S. The Ruth Funk Center for Textile Arts always has interesting and unique exhibits.  You may enjoy some of these related posts:
Southern Accentsart quilts from the southeastern members of Studio Art Quilt Associates.
Florida in Fabric II:  Wish You Were Here, art quilts made by Florida artists.
ReDress:  Nancy Judd Upcycled Style, clothing made from discarded items:  everything from glass shards to parachutes and plastic fruit.

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Coastal Progress

A lot has happened with my coastal piece since I last posted about it.  I’ve now added the bulk of the bottom/foreground section.

Ellen Lindner abstracts a coastal view. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

At about this time I began to question how much I really needed to add on the right.  After some consideration, I ended up deleting the far right column.  This is the new reference photo.  I don’t miss the last part on the right, do you?

Ellen Lindner abstracts a coastal view. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

By the way, do you see the blue painters tape on my cutting mat in the photo above?  I added it to indicate my desired dimensions for each block.  It’s proven to be helpful.

I was really happy with the progress at this point.  I wanted to hint at gold grasses in the foreground and it’s turned out about the way I wanted it.  In the photo below, I was auditioning rock fabrics for the right side.  I needed them to provide contrast with the blue water.  But, I didn’t want them to be nearly as dark as the left rocks.

Ellen Lindner abstracts a coastal view. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

First rock:  not bad.

Ellen Lindner abstracts a coastal view. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

As I continued to work on the right side, I spent a lot of time selecting fabrics.  I wanted the right foreground to be fairly dark brown.  But, the far rocks would be grayer.  I spent a while planning how these fabrics would merge, yet still have enough variety to be interesting.

Ellen Lindner abstracts a coastal view. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

It’s getting there!

Ellen Lindner

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Making Angel Ornaments

After seeing some angel ornaments for sale I got the idea of making something similar as gifts.  But my idea was to add the faces of the recipients to their respective angels. Doesn’t that sound like fun?

I painted the bodies red and added a little shading on the sides.  As you can see, these primitive figures have no shoulders or arms.  Which I kinda love.  It will make the angels almost cartoon-like, giving me lots of artistic latitude.

Making angel ornaments. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The halos got a gold leaf treatment.  Don’t you love the way the black underneath shows through?  I think that sort of imperfection adds a LOT of character and interest.

Making angel ornaments. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

The wings got a rather “fancy” country-style treatment:  cream paint, stained edges, and lace.  Perfect, I think!

Making angel ornaments. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Before assembling the angels, I spent some time on Photoshop tweaking photographs in order to get heads to the right size, etc.  Here’s my first prototype, with me as the subject.

Making angel ornaments. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Isn’t it a hoot?

I’ve now given away the other three, and I can’t believe I forgot to photograph them first!  But, my friend, Lynn, photographed hers.  As you can see, I tried to match the text to the expression on the face.

Making angel ornaments. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

(This is what she gets for striking such a goofy pose in the original photo!)

These were a lot of fun to make and I’ll be making several more.

What craft/art projects are you doing for Christmas?

Ellen Lindner
P.S.  I ordered the angel kits from retrocafeart.com

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Washed Ashore

While visiting our local zoo, we got to see an art exhibit called “Washed Ashore.”  It featured large animal sculptures made entirely from trash which was found on beaches.  The pieces were quilt large and very impressive.

Washed Ashore Exhibit at Brevard Zoon. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

This puffin gives you an idea of the attention to detail that was used.

Washed Ashore Exhibit at Brevard Zoon. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Gatorade lids add texture to the feet.

Washed Ashore Exhibit at Brevard Zoon. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

It’s all  held together with some sort of stapling.

Washed Ashore Exhibit at Brevard Zoon. AdventureQuilter.com/blog
Sea anemone and other plants.  Can you see how colored items were inserted into plastic bottles and used for the sides?

Washed Ashore Exhibit at Brevard Zoon. AdventureQuilter.com/blog
A big octopus.

Washed Ashore Exhibit at Brevard Zoon. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

And a detail shot.

Washed Ashore Exhibit at Brevard Zoon. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

There were about 8-10 of these sculptures.  Here’s a penguin.

Washed Ashore Exhibit at Brevard Zoon. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Washed Ashore Exhibit at Brevard Zoon. AdventureQuilter.com/blog

I was amazed by the skill and CREATIVITY required to build these pieces.  And also, by the vast array of junk that washes up on our shores!

Ellen Lindner

 

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Floral Improv Inaugural Class Scheduled

If you live near Melbourne, FL, you can get in on a really great deal on my new Floral Improv class.  The cost is only $15 because participants will be asked to give me feedback to help me fine tune the class.  Here are the details, along with sample images.

Floral Improv

Class sample for Ellen Lindner's "Floral Improv." AdventureQuilter.com


Want to enhance your artistic skill while making a quick project?  This class will accomplish both.  First, you’ll learn how to make a variety of flowers with no patterns.  After quilting your background, you’ll be ready to create your composition.  With Ellen’s pointers on design you’ll be guaranteed to make a masterpiece.  Finally, you’ll learn a quick technique for facing and finishing your quilt with NO hand sewing!

Your class project will measure about 11″ x 14″ and can be either vertical or horizontal.

Supply List

Class sample for Ellen Lindner's "Floral Improv." AdventureQuilter.com

Boutique 4 Quilters
2945 West New Haven Ave, West Melbourne, FL 32904

Saturday, January 23, 2016

10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.  (with a 30 minute lunch break)

Sign up here

Hope to see you in class!
Ellen Lindner

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$21 Later

I’m not usually an impulse shopper, but every now and then and I get carried away.  Such was the case on a recent visit to thrift shop.  What should I find, but a huge collection of vintage paper doll books!  There were ones from every era, and even political ones, like the Reagans and Clintons.  Too fun!

I immediately have to have them.  (Or at least some of them.)  I bought these, representing the 20’s, 40’s, and 60’s.  That was a pretty good collection, right?

Vintage paper dolls. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Check out some of these wild outfits (and hairdos!)

This looks rather fun, from the 20’s.

Vintage paper dolls. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

But how about this?  And, could you really make your hair do that???

Vintage paper dolls. Ellen Lindner, AdventureQuilter.com/blog

Although these books are pretty cool, I’m mildly kicking myself for buying them.  Because, what will I ever do with them?  I don’t work with vintage themes, people, or paper.  What was I thinking?

What would you do with these?

Ellen Lindner

 

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